What are Sexually Transmitted Infections?

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are infections that can be caused by bacterium, viruses (germs) or parasites (bugs). They are usually spread through sexual contact. Anyone can get an STI. STIs affect men and women of every age, race, religion, rich or poor, and education level. While most STIs can be treated and cured, some stay in the body forever, although there are medicines to manage symptoms. Untreated STIs can cause serious health issues affecting fertility (ability to have a baby) and can cause health problems during and after pregnancy for both women and their babies.

How are STIs spread?

STIs can be spread from:
  • Unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex (intercourse without a condom)
  • Skin to skin touching of infected area
  • Kissing an infected area
  • Sharing sex toys
  • Sharing of needles/rigs or piercing/tattooing needles
  • Mother to child during pregnancy, labour or after delivery through breastfeeding
The most common way to get an STI is from sex, both vaginal and anal.
STIs cannot be spread through:
  • Hugging
  • Holding hands
  • Sharing food or drink
  • Public washrooms
  • Swimming in public pools
  • Sweat
  • Saliva or tears

STI Prevention

Factors that may put people at risk of getting STIs are:
  • Having unprotected sex (without a condom)
  • Believing that using birth control methods (other than a condom) will protect them
  • Believing wrong information about how STIs are spread
  • Using alcohol or drugs, which affect judgment and decision making and may lead to risky situations
  • Having multiple partners
  • Feeling unsure about having sex and not feeling comfortable talking about it
  • Feeling pressured to have sex
  • Sexual assault or violence
How to avoid getting STIs:
  • Choose not to have sex
  • Talk to your partner about lower risk and safer options
  • Avoid skin to skin contact of genitals (sex organs) without a barrier
  • If you choose to have sex, use a condom properly from start to finish
  • Avoid having sex with someone who has lots of partners

How Do STIs Impact Fertility and Pregnancy?

People infected with STIs often do not have symptoms. This means that lots of people are not being tested. A person may have an infection for several years before being diagnosed. Untreated STIs can cause serious complications.

STIs can affect fertility. Because young adults are highly sexually active, this can have a large impact. In addition to their effects on fertility, STIs can also be harmful during pregnancy. STIs can be spread from a pregnant woman to her baby before, during or after birth. Pregnant women should be tested and treated before giving birth to decrease the risk of problems during pregnancy and delivery and complications for the baby.

Possible harmful effects for the baby include:
  • Miscarriage
  • Stillbirth (baby dies before labour or delivery)
  • Low birth weight
  • Eye infection (conjunctivitis)
  • Pneumonia
  • A serious blood infection
  • Blindness
  • Deafness
  • Neurologic (nervous system) damage
  • Swelling of the liver (hepatitis)
  • Swelling in the brain (meningitis)
  • Liver disease
Most of these problems can be avoided if the pregnant woman receives routine prenatal care, including STI testing early on in the pregnancy and again close to delivery.

Getting Tested

If you are sexually active, you may not know you have an STI because there are often no symptoms. Even if no symptoms are present the infection can still be passed to other people.

  • If you have unprotected sex, get tested.
  • If you are sexually active, get tested for STIs every year.
  • If you have a new partner, get tested.
  • If you are infected, contact past sexual partners.
Remember, you can get an STI over and over again. Make sure both you and your partner(s) are tested.

Testing can be performed by a family doctor, at a local medical clinic/public health office or hospital. To find STI testing sites in Saskatchewan, try the KIS-SK app by visiting KIS-SK App.

 

Chlamydia

What is Chlamydia?

Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by bacterium. The infection is spread by having unprotected anal, vaginal, or oral sex and can be passed from a mother to baby during delivery. Chlamydia is the most common STI in the world. The majority of cases are among young adults aged 15-24.

How do I Know if I Have Chlamydia?

If you are sexually active it is important to get tested regularly for STIs. Most people will not have symptoms and will not know they are infected. Even if no symptoms are present, the infection can still be passed to other people. If symptoms are present, the following may appear 5-10 days after infection:

Women
  • Itching feeling around vagina
  • Discharge from vagina
  • Bleeding between periods or after sex
  • Pain in the lower abdomen or when urinating
Men
  • Burning when urinating
  • Pain or swelling of testicles
  • Clear discharge from penis
  • Burning or itching around opening of penis

How do I Find out if I Have Chlamydia?

Testing for chlamydia is done either by a urine sample or swabbing the infected area. This test can be performed by a doctor, a nurse, or staff at an STI clinic, medical clinic or hospital.

Can Chlamydia be Cured?

Usually a single dose of antibiotics can cure chlamydia. These antibiotics are free from medical clinics and family doctors in Saskatchewan. Re-infection is possible if treatment is not finished or the partner is infected and not treated. Infections of chlamydia and gonorrhea are often seen together. Treatment will often be given for both infections, even if only one is identified.

Can Chlamydia Affect Fertility?

Women who do not receive treatment can develop pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which can result in pain, ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus where the fetus cannot survive) or infertility (unable to have babies).

Men who do not receive treatment may develop swelling of urethra (tube in the penis that carries the urine out of the body) and testicles which could lead to infertility.

How will a Positive Test Result Affect me and my Baby?

Women who have chlamydia can pass the infection to their baby while they are pregnant or during delivery. Women who are not treated may have a miscarriage or a premature delivery. Babies born with this infection can develop serious eye or lung infections.

Can I Breastfeed if I Have Chlamydia?

Women who have chlamydia can continue to breastfeed but should check with their health care provider to be sure that medications taken to treat the infection will not harm the baby.

Gonorrhoea

What is Gonorrhoea?

Gonorrhoea is caused by bacterium and is the second most commonly reported sexually transmitted infection (STI) in Canada. Gonorrhoea is transmitted through unprotected anal, vaginal, or oral sex and can be passed from mother to baby during birth.

How do I know if I have Gonorrhoea?

If you are sexually active it is important to get tested regularly for STIs. Most people infected with gonorrhoea have no symptoms. Even if no symptoms are present, the infection can still be passed to other people. When symptoms do occur they may appear two to seven days after infection and include the following:

Women
  • An increase in vaginal discharge
  • Bleeding during sex or between periods
  • Pain in the lower abdomen
  • Pain when urinating
Men
  • Burning during urination
  • Pain in the testicles
  • Burning or itching around the tip of the penis
  • A thick greenish-yellow discharge from penis

How do I Find out if I Have Gonorrhoea?

Testing for gonorrhoea is done either by a urine sample or a swabbing of the infected area. This test can be performed by a doctor, a nurse, or staff at an STI clinic, medical clinic or hospital.

Can Gonorrhoea be Cured?

Usually a single dose of antibiotics can cure gonorrhoea. Antibiotics are free from medical clinics and family doctors in Saskatchewan. You can get gonorrhoea again if treatment is not finished or your partner is infected and not treated. Infections of chlamydia and gonorrhea are often seen together. Treatment will often be given for both infections, even if only one is identified.

Can Gonorrhoea Affect Fertility?

Women who have gonorrhoea and do not seek treatment may develop pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which can result in pain, ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus where the fetus cannot survive), or infertility in women.

No treatment for men could potentially lead to a testicle infection which if left untreated can cause infertility.

How will a Positive Test Result Affect me and my Baby?

If a pregnant woman is infected with gonorrhoea, there is a risk of miscarriage or preterm labour.

Women who have gonorrhoea can pass the infection to their baby while they are pregnant or during delivery. Babies born with gonorrhoea may develop arthritis, meningitis or a severe eye disease that if left untreated could lead to blindness. When testing is not available or questionable, putting silver nitrate drops into the newborn’s eyes will prevent bacteria from causing eye infections.

Can I Breastfeed if I Have Gonorrhoea?

Women who have gonorrhoea can continue to breastfeed but should check with their health care provider to be sure that the drugs taken to treat the infection will not harm the baby.

Hepatitis B

What is Hepatitis B?

Hepatitis B is a serious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. The virus can cause life-long infection, cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer and even death. Hepatitis B is very contagious and spreads with exposure to blood or body fluids of an infected person. The virus can be spread through sexual contact, by sharing needles, sharps or personal items such as razors or toothbrushes. Hepatitis B can also be passed from mother to child throughout pregnancy, during and after birth. In Canada, a vaccination is available for hepatitis B.

How do I Know if I Have Hepatitis B?

People who have been infected by the hepatitis B virus first experience an acute illness (short-term). Symptoms may include flu-like conditions including:

  • Tiredness
  • Stomach pain
  • Aching of joints
  • Loss of appetite

Ninety-percent of people with acute hepatitis B will clear the virus. If the virus is still present after six months, the infection is considered chronic (long-term) and it is unlikely that the virus will ever leave the body. Chronic hepatitis B symptoms include:

  • Jaundice (yellowing of skin and eyes)
  • Fever
  • Liver enlargement
  • Abdominal pain

How do I Find out if I Have Hepatitis B?

A blood sample is taken to test for hepatitis B.

Can Hepatitis B be Cured?

Chronic hepatitis B cannot be cured. Medications are available to control chronic hepatitis B from spreading. This test can be performed by a doctor, a nurse, or staff at a STI clinic, medical clinic or hospital. A hepatitis B vaccine is available in Canada.

Can Hepatitis B Affect Fertility?

There is no consensus in research stating that having hepatitis B affects fertility (ability to have a baby) for either women or men.

How will a Positive Test Result Affect me and my Baby?

During the first three months of pregnancy, infected women have a high risk of miscarriage.

Mothers can pass hepatitis B to their baby throughout pregnancy, during and after birth. If a woman has a positive test before becoming pregnant, she can be treated so the baby does not become infected. If the virus is detected when a woman is pregnant, treatment can be started for the unborn baby to reduce baby’s chance of getting hepatitis B.

Babies born to mothers who are infected should be treated with the vaccine within 12 hours of birth. Second and third doses should follow within 6 months.

Can I Breastfeed if I Have Hepatitis B?

It is safe to breastfeed as there have not been reports of the virus being transmitted through breastfeeding. It is recommended that the baby receive the vaccine within twelve hours of birth, along with a second dose at 1-2 months and third dose at 6 months. It is not necessary to delay breastfeeding until all doses are given. It is important for infected mothers who breastfeed to take care of their nipples to avoid cracking and bleeding.

Hepatitis C

What is Hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease caused by a virus that is spread from blood to blood contact. Hepatitis C is generally spread by sharing needles, sharps or personal items such as razors or toothbrushes that have been exposed to infected blood. The disease can be transmitted through sexual contact with an infected partner but this is rare and happens only if there is blood to blood contact. Transmission can occur from mother to child during child birth and delivery.

How do I Know if I Have Hepatitis C?

If you are exposed to blood to blood contact, it is important to be tested. Almost three quarters of people infected with acute (new, short-term) hepatitis C infection show no initial symptoms. In people that do show symptoms the following may be present:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Jaundice (yellowing of skin and eyes)
  • Fatigue
  • Darkening of the urine

Although some people will clear the virus from their body within weeks, the majority (85%) will go on to develop a chronic (long-term) infection which may lead to liver damage and liver cancer.

How do I Find out if I Have Hepatitis C?

A blood test is required to test for hepatitis C. If the results are positive, a second blood test will be done to determine if infection is still present and how much virus is present in the blood.

Can Hepatitis C be Cured?

Some people are able to clear the virus from their bodies in the first 6 months after infection. For those who still have hepatitis C after this time, there is medication that can clear it from the body in the majority of people.

Can Hepatitis C Affect Fertility?

There is little evidence stating that having hepatitis C affects chances of having a baby in the future for either women or men.

How will a Positive Test Result Affect me and my Baby?

There is risk of hepatitis C spreading to the unborn baby or to the newborn during delivery if they are exposed to the mother’s blood. Symptoms in newborns are similar to adults and may include jaundice, fever and vomiting.

Women with low levels of hepatitis C in their blood are less likely to pass the infection on to their child. Mothers may be given antiviral medication to reduce the levels of hepatitis C in the bloodstream during delivery.

Research has shown some of the common treatments for Hepatitis C may cause birth defects and/or miscarriage and should be avoided during pregnancy. Pregnant women should consult a health care professional about possible risks.

Can I Breastfeed if I Have Hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C has been found in breast milk and it is recommended that breastfeeding not be done if the mother’s nipples are cracked or bleeding since transmission can occur through blood.

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

What is HPV?

Human papilloma virus (HPV) is a virus that causes genital warts in both males and females. The virus is very contagious and is spread through skin-to-skin contact with an infected partner. Infected mothers can also pass on the virus to their baby. Condoms can reduce the risk of sexually transmitted HPV, but do not provide total protection.

How do I Know if I Have HPV?

HPV presents as soft, itchy warts in and around the genitals. Even if there are no warts, the virus may be present and can be spread.

How do I Find out if I Have HPV?

Women may request a Pap test and/or a physical examination. Men may request a physical examination.

Can HPV be Cured?

No. Warts can be removed through surgery or medication but the virus remains in the body. In Canada, the HPV vaccine is available for use in women 9-26 years old. This is given by needle in three doses. This vaccine provides protection for the four most common strands of this virus.

Can HPV Affect Fertility?

HPV does not affect a woman’s chance of having a baby.

For men, fertility does not seem to be affected unless the immune system is unable to clear the virus, resulting in warts blocking the reproductive tract.

How will a Positive Test result Affect me and my Baby?

There are over 100 different types of HPV. There are about 35 types of HPV that infect the reproductive system. Women infected with high risk HPV along with other factors (stressed immune system, poor nutrition, smoking) may have a chance of developing cervical cancer.

Pregnant women should be tested for HPV, as pregnancy makes existing warts worse and may cause complications during the delivery of the baby. Infection can be spread to the baby and can occur either during pregnancy or birth. If the birth canal is blocked by warts, a Caesarian section may be performed.

If the mother is infected, infants may have wart growth in throats, or develop oral and genital warts.

Can I Breastfeed if I Have HPV?

Research has shown that the virus is present in the breast milk of some women but breastfeeding has not been shown to spread the virus to the baby.

Nongonococcal Urethritis

What is Nongonococcal Urethritis?

Nongonococcal urethritis is an STI that causes swelling of the urethra (tube leaving body carrying urine) that is not caused by gonorrhoea bacterium. The infection is spread by having unprotected anal, vaginal, or oral sex and can be passed from a mother to baby during delivery. Both men and women can get nongonococcal urethritis, but it is more common in men because a woman’s urethra is less easily infected during sex.

How do I Know if I Have Nongonococcal Urethritis?

If you are sexually active it is important to get tested regularly for STIs. Most people will not have symptoms and will not know they are infected. Even if no symptoms are present, the infection can still be passed to other people. If symptoms are present, the following may appear one to five weeks after infection:

Women
  • Pain or itching during or after urination
Men
  • Itching, irritation of penis
  • Pain when urinating
  • Discharge
  • Drying of opening of penis

How do I Find out if I Have Nongonococcal Urethritis?

Testing for nongonococcal urethritis is done either by a urine sample or testing the discharge. This test can be performed by a doctor, a nurse, or staff at an STI clinic, medical clinic or hospital.

Can Nongonococcal Urethritis be Cured?

Usually a single dose of antibiotics will cure nongonococcal urethritis. Antibiotics are free from medical clinics and family doctors in Saskatchewan. Re-infection is possible if treatment is not finished or the partner is infected and not treated. Past infection does not make a person immune to future infections.

Can Nongonococcal Urethritis Affect Fertility?

Women who do not receive treatment can develop pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which can result in pain, infection of fallopian tubes, or infertility (unable to have a baby).

Men who do not receive treatment may develop inflammation of the testicles which could lead to infertility or develop a prostrate (gland in males below the bladder involved in the release of sperm) infection.

How will a Positive Test Result Affect me and my Baby?

Women who are not treated have a risk of having a miscarriage or a preterm delivery.

Women who have nongonococcal urethritis can give the infection to their baby during delivery. Babies born with this infection can develop serious eye, ear or lung infections.

Can I Breastfeed if I have Nongonococcal Urethritis?

Women who have nongonococcal urethritiscan continue to breastfeed but should check with their health care provider to be sure that the medication taken to treat the infection will not harm the baby.

Genital Herpes

What is Genital Herpes?

Genital herpes is a viral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. Genital herpes can be transmitted through skin-to-skin contact, including oral, vaginal and anal sex. If sores are present, it can be passed from mother to baby during or after birth.

How do I Know if I Have Genital Herpes?

If you are sexually active it is important to get tested regularly for sexually transmitted infections (STIs).The first outbreak of genital herpes is usually the worst. The infection may present as a group of blisters that burst and cause painful sores in the genital area (vagina or penis). These heal in two to three weeks. A fever, muscular pain and a headache may also be present during the first attack.

How do I Find out if I Have Genital Herpes?

A blood sample is taken to test for genital herpes. Testing of tissue samples from an active sore or blister can also determine if herpes is present. This test can be performed by a doctor, a nurse, or staff at an STI clinic, medical clinic or hospital.

Can Genital Herpes be Cured?

There is no cure for genital herpes although there are medications that may help clear the symptoms faster.

Can Genital Herpes affect Fertility?

Genital herpes does not seem to play a role in a woman’s fertility (ability to have a baby).

Some research has indicated genital herpes may cause infertility in men as the sperm may be affected in certain circumstances.

How will a Positive Test Result Affect me and my Baby?

If a woman has sores or blisters, herpes can be given to the baby during childbirth and delivery. If a mother does have genital herpes with open sores or blisters, doctors may perform a Caesarian section to reduce risk of passing infection to baby.

Genital herpes can cause serious skin, eye and mouth infections or other complications in the newborn.

Can I Breastfeed if I Have Genital Herpes?

Genital herpes are spread through contact with sores, so if a mother has sores on the nipple or areola, breastfeeding from that breast is not recommended. Milk can be pumped in order to keep up milk supply and prevent the breast from getting engorged. Milk that comes in contact with the sores should not be used.

Syphilis

What is Syphilis?

Syphilis is caused by a bacteria found in the blood. Transmission occurs through unprotected anal, vaginal, or oral sex and can be passed from a pregnant mother to her unborn child. Although occurrence is rare, if infected and left untreated, consequences are severe and can result in death.

How do I Know if I Have Syphilis?

If you are sexually active it is important to get tested regularly for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Syphilis is difficult to diagnose. It is often called the “great imitator” because the symptoms look like symptoms of other diseases. There are four different stages to the infection: primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary. Infected persons may or may not experience symptoms during one or more of the stages. Syphilis is most infectious during the first two stages and if left untreated, causes the most harm during the final two stages.

Primary Syphilis

Usually appears about 3 weeks after infection

A painless sore appears in the genital area. This sore can heal without treatment and can disappear within a three to eight week period after infection.

Secondary Syphilis

Usually appears 1-2 months after primary sore heals

Without treatment, the majority of infected persons will develop secondary syphilis. This stage typically lasts for 3-12 weeks but may last longer until infection moves into latent infection.

Secondary syphilis symptoms may include:
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Hair loss
  • Rash on palms of hands and soles of feet
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Wart like lesions

Latent Syphilis

Although some people may experience recurrent sores during this stage, most people have no symptoms. This stage can last from 1-30 years. Latent stage syphilis is very risky for pregnant women as there may be no symptoms but the effects on the unborn child are very serious.

Tertiary Syphilis

If the infection remains untreated, tertiary syphilis may develop in 1/3 of infected people. Over time, damage to the heart, liver, brain and eyes is possible. In some cases, untreated syphilis results in death.

How do I Find out if I Have Syphilis?

To test for syphilis a blood test or a swabbing of the infected sore is done. Tests can be performed by a doctor, a nurse, or staff at an STI clinic, medical clinic or hospital.

Can Syphilis be Cured?

Yes, syphilis can be treated with antibiotics at all stages. Antibiotics are free from medical clinics and family doctors. Re-infection is possible if treatment is not finished or if an infected partner is not treated.

Can Syphilis Affect Fertility?

Syphilis has not been proven to have a significant effect on the fertility of infected women or men.

How will a Positive Test Result Affect me and my Baby?

Women should be screened for syphilis within the first three months of pregnancy as there can be severe consequences when a mother has untreated syphilis. Women at high risk for infection should be retested in the last trimester. Infection can be spread from mother to baby during pregnancy or delivery. Syphilis can cause miscarriage, preterm birth, low birth weight, stillbirth, or death of newborn.

Infants born to women who have an untreated primary or secondary syphilis infection will develop congenital (present at birth) syphilis. Half will develop early congenital syphilis (presents in first two years of life) and the remainder will develop late congenital syphilis (symptoms do not present until puberty).

Most infants have no symptoms, but early congenital syphilis may appear within a few days to eight weeks of life and include a rash on the hands and feet and a runny nose. Late congenital syphilis symptoms may include neurological (nervous system) problems, with significant delays in a child’s physical, cognitive, behavioral, emotional, or social wellbeing and/or skeletal deformity. These symptoms can present in infected individuals up to age 30.

Can I Breastfeed if I Have Syphilis?

Mothers who have syphilis can breastfeed their baby if there are no open sores present but should check with their health care provider to be sure that the drugs taken to treat the infection will not harm the baby.

Trichomoniasis

What is Trichomoniasis?

Trichomoniasis, often called “trich”, is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by a parasite. Trichomoniasis infection can cause harmful health concerns for both men and women, including increased HIV transmission and infertility.

How do I Know if I Have Trichomoniasis?

If you are sexually active it is important to get tested regularly for STIs. In women, symptoms can range from no symptoms to severe inflammation and irritation. Even if no symptoms are present, the infection can still be passed to other people. Other symptoms may include:

  • Foul-smelling vaginal discharge
  • Lower abdominal pain
  • Painful or difficult urination

The majority of men experience no symptoms although some may have inflammation of urethra (the tube within the penis) or prostrate. Symptoms may include:

  • Painful urination
  • Mild discharge
  • Irritation or redness on top of penis

How do I Find out if I Have Trichomoniasis?

Testing for trichomoniasis requires a physical examination or lab test to detect the parasite that causes the infection.This test can be performed by a doctor, a nurse, staff at an STI clinic, medical clinic or hospital.

Can Trichomoniasis be Cured?

Usually one treatment of a type of antibiotics, called metronidazole, will cure trichomoniasis. Medication is free from medical clinics and family doctors in Saskatchewan. Re-infection is possible if treatment is not finished or partner is infected and not treated.

Can Trichomoniasis Affect Fertility?

If left untreated, fertility of both women and men may be affected.

In untreated women, the infection is thought to be specific to the vagina as the parasite moves freely in the vagina and may disrupt normal sperm movement. This interruption can make it difficult for sperm to fertilize the egg causing infertility.

For untreated men, the sperm that travels through an infected urethra (tube where urine and semen leave penis) may be affected in movement and strength, decreasing the ability to reach and fertilize the egg causing infertility.

How will a Positive Test Result Affect me and my Baby?

Infection while pregnant may result in preterm delivery or premature membrane rupture.

Babies born to infected mothers may have low birth weight, urinary tract infections, inflammation of the vagina, and respiratory distress.

The medication used to treat trichomoniasis may cause complications during pregnancy and women should discuss with their health care professional the benefits and potential risks of treatment before taking any medication.

Can I Breastfeed if I Have Trichomoniasis?

The drugs used to treat trichomoniasis may be harmful for the baby during breastfeeding. It is recommended women not breastfeed during treatment and for up to 12-24 hours after last dose. Women should tell their health care provide if they are or think they are pregnant.

The STI Adventures

The STI Adventures

The STI Adventures has been created to provide an interactive opportunity to learn about sexually transmitted infections (also known as STIs) and their effect on fertility, pregnancy, and newborn babies. The project is recommended for middle and high school students.

If you are interested in having a presentation on how to use this e-learning project with your class or youth group, please contact the program coordinator at info@skprevention.ca or call 306-651-4300.

Adobe Flash is required to access the project. Click here for the free download.

Youth-Created Videos on STIs and Unplanned Pregnancy

The Saskatchewan Prevention Institute works in areas of reproductive health that are of particular pertinence to the health of Saskatchewan’s population. Rates of adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Saskatchewan are among the highest in Canada. Adolescent pregnancy is associated with poorer outcomes for the mom and the baby. If STIs aren’t treated, they can cause serious health issues for males, females, and unborn babies.

The Prevention Institute believes that young people should be included in primary prevention efforts. Youth in Saskatchewan were asked to participate in a video contest focused on helping other young people make healthy choices to reduce their risk of STIs and unplanned pregnancies.

Two of the awards went to the Tisdale Middle and Secondary School students. Jeremy Ernst developed his own video, STI Awareness, while Kanna Jorde, Kristen Wallington, and Trisha Wallington worked together to develop the STI Video. The third award was received by Alia Hogan for her video, Wrapped.

Following are the links to the three winning videos. Congratulations to each of the winners!
  • STI Video
    by Kristen Wallington, Trisha Wallington, and Kanna Jorde

  • STI Awareness
    by Jeremy Ernst

  • Wrapped
    by Alia Hogan

Links

Links for Youth

Games
Information
  • Action Canada for Sexual Health & Rights

    Action Canada for Sexual Health & Rights is committed to advancing and upholding sexual and reproductive health and rights in Canada and globally. The organization is an amalgamation between three Canadian organizations, Canadians for Choice (CFC), the Canadian Federation for Sexual Health (CFSH), and Action Canada for Population and Development (ACPD).

  • Government of Alberta, Health and Wellness

    Provides an STI Teaching Outline and Resource Guide. The teaching guide includes student learning activities (true/false STI quiz, dot game to show STI transmission, role plays, case studies), a resource guide (government services, community resources, audio-visual, print resources, websites), and a glossary.

  • Government of Alberta, Health and Wellness: STI – Keep Healthy

    A plain language pamphlet that briefly discusses fertility, pregnancy, and the newborn.

  • Public Health Agency of Canada

    Created the Canadian Guidelines on Sexually Transmitted Infections, a resource for clinical and professionals dealing with prevention, treatment and management of sexually transmitted infections.

  • Sexuality and U

    This website is administered by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC), and is designed to provide credible and up-to-date information and education on sexual health.

STIs and Infertility

Resources