Prevention Matters 2017

Purpose:

Prevention Matters 2017 will provide opportunities to explore prevention efforts to support the health of Saskatchewan children. The conference will focus on four streams: public health; child maltreatment; maternal and infant health; resources and skill development for individuals who work directly with families (mothers, fathers, and other caregivers) and children.

Objectives:
  • Apply prevention/primary care strategies to emerging public health issues related to children and families
  • Explore current issues and new evidence pertinent to the identification, investigation, management, and prevention of child maltreatment
  • Discuss application of best evidence regarding current and emerging issues that impact the outcome of pregnancy for both the woman and infant
  • Practice skills and strategies to enhance the interaction between care provider and families
  • Explore the impact of trauma on the health of children and families and recognize the importance of a trauma-informed approach in clinical and non-clinical provision of care
  • Develop inter-sectoral connections that will facilitate prevention efforts

Speaker Bios

Keynote SpeakersConcurrent Speakers
Charlene Bearhead
Charlene Bearhead
October 4, 2017 | 3:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Integrating the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action into Practice

Charlene Bearhead is a mother, grandmother, community member, experienced educator, and education innovator with 30 years of regional, national, and international experience in the field. Most recently, Charlene served as the first Education Lead for the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation at the University of Manitoba, and is currently the project coordinator for the Alberta Joint Commitment to Action: Education for Reconciliation. She currently serves as the co-chair of the Downie-Wenjack Fund Board of Directors and is a member of the Pathways to Education Canada Indigenous Education Advisory Circle.

Charlene previously served as the National Coordinator for Project of Heart, the primary focus of which is the education of Canadians on the history and legacy of Indian Residential Schools in Canada; and for the National Day of Healing and Reconciliation, the primary goal of which is to educate Canadians on the legacy of federal government policy on various ethnic groups throughout Canada’s history and to promote respect and reconciliation. Ms. Bearhead coordinated the Education Days within the TRC National Events for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, which focused on inspiring teachers and students to further educate themselves around the history and legacy of Indian Residential Schools, as well as to support and facilitate the building of positive and respectful relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Canada.

Bearhead also served as the National Coordinator for the National Addictions Awareness Week at Native Counselling Services of Alberta. She was the curriculum writer for the education program Sacred Relationship with Water (www.sacredrelationship.ca) with BearPaw Media Productions. Charlene was the founder of Mother Earth’s Children’s Charter School in Alberta and coordinated the youth track of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2002 and the children’s program of the same international gathering in Edmonton, Alberta in 2006.

Charlene has served as a teacher, principal, education director, and superintendent, both on and off reserve, over the years and holds permanent teaching certificates from both Alberta and Manitoba.


Alec Corous
Alec Couros
October 5, 2017 | 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Raising the Selfie Generation: Social Media, Mental Health, and Digital Citizenship

Dr. Alec Couros is a professor of educational technology and media at the Faculty of Education, University of Regina, Saskatchewan. An award-winning educator, Alec helps his undergraduate and graduate students take up the incredible affordances of our connected world through the integration of educational technology in teaching and learning. Alec is also a well-recognized scholar and researcher who has given hundreds of keynotes and workshops around the globe on diverse topics such as connected/networked learning, digital citizenship, social media in education, and critical media literacy, providing educators, students, and parents with the knowledge necessary to take advantage of and thrive in our new digital reality. Finally, Alec is a passionate advocate of openness in education and demonstrates this commitment through his open access publications, considerable digital presence and contributions, and highly successful MOOCs and open boundary courses.

James Irvine
James Irvine
October 4, 2017 | 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Children’s Health: Standing Together

Dr. James Irvine, MD, MSc, CCFP, FCFP, FRCP is a public health and preventive medicine physician, a Professor Emeritus with the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Medicine, and has been the Medical Health Officer for the northern half of the province. He is an Associate Member of the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology and the School of Public Health. Dr. Irvine has lived in La Ronge for over 35 years, where he has been involved with public health, family medicine, administration, teaching, and research. His main public health and research interests involve environmental health, communicable disease control, health promotion, children’s health, and Indigenous health. James has been a member of the Medical Advisory Committee of the Prevention Institute since 2001 and the chair since 2014.

Sheldon Kennedy
Sheldon Kennedy
October 6, 2017 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Why I Didn’t Say Anything

Sheldon Kennedy won a Memorial Cup, World Junior Gold Medal, and skated for three teams in his eight-year NHL career. He is best known for his courageous decision to charge his Major Junior Hockey League coach with sexual assault for the abuse he suffered over a five-year period while a teenager under his care. Through this disclosure, and the important work that Sheldon continues to do, he has become an inspiration to millions of abuse survivors around the world.

Sheldon has been instrumental in bringing governments, public and private sector partners together to work collaboratively to influence policy change and improve the way child abuse is handled. He has influenced changes in Canadian law and has taken his message to the International Olympic Committee and the US Senate.

Sheldon is the Lead Director at the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre, the first-of-its-kind in Canada, offering full wrap-around services for victims of child abuse. He is also the co-founder of Respect Group Inc., which provides empowering online abuse, bullying and harassment prevention education to sport organizations, schools, and the workplace.


Linda O’Neill
Linda O’Neill
October 5, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Supporting Children and Families in Communities of Compassionate Practice: Trauma-Informed Approach

Dr. Linda O’Neill is a practicing counsellor, a certified trauma specialist, and Associate Professor at the University of Northern BC, and is the Clinical Coordinator at the Community Care Centre in Prince George, BC. From years of trauma practice in the Prince George community and the far North and through research on all aspects of trauma effects and interventions, Dr. O’Neill has compiled and designed trauma informed training with former research assistants and colleagues. Dr. O’Neill customizes the training for each professional group to ensure the greatest relevancy to practice. The training is constantly being refined to reflect the most recent research in the rapidly changing world of trauma support. This training has been customized and delivered to early childhood educators, teachers and support staff, graduate counselling students, BEd students, counsellors, drug and alcohol programs, Corrections professionals, Parole and Probation, Crown Council, John Howard Society volunteers, Youth Justice, and practitioners in Mental Health and Addictions and Primary Care teams within the Northern Health Authority.

Corey O’Soup
Corey O’Soup
October 4, 2017 | 4:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saskatchewan’s Advocate for Children and Youth

Corey O’Soup currently serves as Saskatchewan’s Advocate for Children and Youth. He was appointed on August 3, 2016 and assumed the position on November 1, 2016. Born and raised in Saskatchewan, Corey is a member of the Key First Nation and became the province’s first First Nations Advocate. Corey and his wife Jacinda have five children. Corey has an extensive career working on behalf of children and youth in his roles as teacher, senior policy analyst for the FSIN, provincial superintendent for the Ministry of Education, senior manager for the Alberta Ministry of Education, Executive Director for Education/Post-Secondary Education and Training for the FSIN, and as the First Nations and Métis Advisor at the Ministry of Education. In that role, Corey was appointed by the Premier to take the lead on the government’s response to the fatal shooting at a school in La Loche in January 2016. As the Advocate for Children and Youth, Corey says his priorities will be finding ways to reduce the number of First Nations and Métis youth in care. He also has a passion for improving mental health services for children and youth in Saskatchewan, and especially in the north where he has promised a special report on the issues surrounding youth suicides.

Juliet Soper
Juliet Soper
October 4, 2017 | 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Children’s Health: Standing Together

Dr. Juliet Soper graduated MBChB from the University of Auckland in 1997. She completed her paediatric training at Starship Children’s Hospital in Auckland, New Zealand, achieving Fellowship of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians in 2010. Since 2012, she has been in Saskatchewan working at Regina General Hospital as a general pediatrician doing child maltreatment pediatrics, acute care pediatrics, and developmental pediatrics. In addition, Dr. Soper is currently Head of the Department of Pediatrics at Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region and a member of the clinical faculty of the University of Saskatchewan. She holds fellowship with the Royal Canadian College of Physicians and Surgeons in Paediatrics.

David Torr
David Torr
October 4, 2017 | 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Children’s Health: Standing Together

Dr. David Torr, a physician in Saskatchewan with over three decades of experience in the medical field, has a strong passion for health and prevention.

His experience covers parts of Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America, and has had training at the universities of London, Makerere, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Saskatchewan, as well as the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the former Canadian Emergency Measures College.

In Saskatchewan, he has worked as a Medical Health Officer from as far back as 1991, for the City of Saskatoon, Swift Current and Saskatoon when districts, and in more recent years, in a number of regions, most especially in the south west part of the province.

He is also an associate clinical professor at the University of Saskatchewan, and current chair of the Medical Health Officers’ Council of Saskatchewan.

Barb Afseth
Barb Afseth
October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Understanding and Working with Traumatized and Maltreated Children

Barb Afseth, MSW, has worked in the field of children’s mental health for approximately 12 years. She has extensive experience in providing clinical services to children who are victims of, or have been witnesses of, crime. She has completed the “Train the Trainer” training in the Neuro-Sequential Model of Therapeutics through Dr. Bruce Perry and the ChildTrauma Academy. Barb has also been providing workshops across the province to Child and Youth Mental Health staff, spreading knowledge regarding the impact of early adverse experiences on brain development and what we can do to help.

Asma Ahmed
Asma Ahmed
October 4, 2017 | 1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Maternal Depression in Syrian Refugee Women Recently Moved to Canada: A Preliminary Study

Asma Ahmed is a Master of Public Health-thesis candidate at the University of Saskatchewan. She received her M.D. degree from Al Margeb University-Libya. Ahmed’s current research involves analyzing longitudinal data that was collected over five years from Saskatchewan women, during their perinatal period, to identify distinct trajectories of perinatal depressive and anxiety symptoms and the associated risk factors. Ahmed’s research also involves the study of maternal mental health among Syrian refugee women. She has presented her research results at local and national conferences, as well as to various local community and professional groups. She translated maternal mental health tools into Arabic to facilitate care providers in supporting women whose first language is Arabic.

Sherri Armstrong
Sherri Armstrong
October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Introduction to Handle with Care: Promoting the Mental Health of Young Children with Four Key Building Blocks

Sherri Armstrong is a Project Coordinator for the Milestones Project in Mental Health and Wellness in Battle River area. Sherri is a Master Trainer for Handle with Care and a contributor to the program. Laurie and Sherri, along with another HWC contributor, have delivered workshops in Yukon and B.C. Laurie and Sherri first embraced Handle with Care over 10 years ago and have been collaborating ever since. “HWC has been the best learning experience and I am so grateful that we can share it with others.”

Sherri previously worked in the Yukon where she was an instructor in the Early Childhood Program at Yukon College. She was also a supervisor for a disability program and worked with young children, their families, and caregivers throughout the Yukon with the Child Development Centre. Sherri has created and facilitated many different workshops and enjoys getting young children and their families active and healthy.


Jill Bally
Jill Bally
October 5, 2017 | 1:20 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
Type 2 Diabetes in Canadian Aboriginal Youth: A Public Health Crisis?

Jill Bally, RN, PhD is a registered nurse and has practiced in pediatrics for the past 22 years. She has recently completed her PhD in nursing, and her doctoral studies focused on pediatric oncology and family centered nursing care. Currently, Jill continues to develop her program of research related to the health and wellness of children and families who are affected by childhood illnesses. Jill is an Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan.

Johanna Bergerman
Johanna Bergerman
October 6, 2017 | 10:10 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Creating a Culturally Safe Place: Saskatoon Mothers’ Centre Breastfeeding Peer Support Program

Johanna Bergerman is a Public Health Nutritionist and a Lactation Consultant with the Saskatoon Health Region. She is also completing her Masters in Women and Gender Studies at the University of Saskatchewan.

Angela Bowen
Angela Bowen
October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Where Are We Now? Update on the Initiatives of the MotherFirst Maternal Mental Health Strategy in Saskatchewan
October 5, 2017 | 10:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.
Healthy Nutrition and Gestational Weight Gain in Pregnancy

Angela Bowen, RN, PhD is a Registered Nurse and Professor within the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan. She has extensive clinical, educator, and administrator experience in Obstetrics and Mental Health. Angela received a Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation New Investigator Establishment Award to evaluate the Maternal Mental Health Program that she spearheaded in Saskatoon. She holds CIHR funding for a longitudinal study of mother-child dyads from early pregnancy to age five. Angela facilitates the MotherFirst Maternal Mental Health Strategy in Saskatchewan; a knowledge translation project to increase awareness of maternal mental health. This project is also funded by CIHR. Angela was co-chair of the Registered Nurses of Ontario Best Practice Guidelines for Perinatal Depression and a member of the Family-Centered Maternity Care Guidelines Committee of Health Canada.

Carol Bullin
Carol Bullin
October 5, 2017 | 1:20 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
Type 2 Diabetes in Canadian Aboriginal Youth: A Public Health Crisis?

Carol Bullin, RN, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan. Her professional practice experience includes critical care, operating room, and kidney disease/peritoneal dialysis. Carol is working to develop her program of research that focuses on chronic kidney disease self-management and health promotion of Indigenous peoples in rural and remote populations.

Tim Bradley
Tim Bradley
October 5, 2017 | 10:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.
CHAMPS: Children’s Healthy-Heart and Activity Monitoring Program in Saskatchewan

Dr. Tim Bradley is a Pediatric Cardiologist at the Royal University Hospital in Saskatoon and Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Bradley obtained his medical degree from the University of Otago, New Zealand in 1990 and his FRACP in Pediatrics and Pediatric Cardiology in 2002. He trained at the Wellington Hospital, New Zealand; the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia; British Columbia Children’s Hospital in Vancouver; and The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto. He was on staff as a Pediatric Cardiologist at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto from 2004-2015 and as an Assistant Professor 2004-2011 and Associate Professor 2011-2015 in the Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics at the University of Toronto. Dr. Bradley’s research is focused on the detection of premature atherosclerosis in at-risk pediatric disease populations and developing a better understanding of aortic wall biomechanics that predispose to aortopathy.

Stephanie Cerutti
Stephanie Cerutti
October 5, 2017 | 11:20 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities’ Early Child Development and Primary Prevention Intervention Program and its Impact on Indigenous Children, Their Families, and Their Communities Across Canada

Stephanie Cerutti works with the Public Health Agency of Canada on the Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities program in a performance measurement capacity. She also works with researchers from universities and other governmental departments to provide additional research regarding healthy child development intervention and planning information for the AHSUNC program.

Louise Choquette
Louise Choquette
October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m.– 2:30 p.m.
Children See – Children Learn

Louise Choquette has been with the Best Start Resource Centre since 2005, where she has led initiatives in reaching Francophones, reproductive and child health of newcomers, physical activity, prenatal education, tobacco control, and early brain development. Her previous employment was with public health in Ontario.

Jorden Cummings
Jorden Cummings
October 4, 2017 | 2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Reaching Thriving Recovery: A Grounded Theory of Parent Responses to Child Interpersonal Trauma

Jorden A. Cummings is an Associate Professor and Clinical Psychologist with the Department of Psychology at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research focuses on how parents are impacted after their children experience interpersonal trauma as well as stigma and blame assigned to non-offending parents of child trauma victims.

Kayla DeMong
Kayla DeMong
October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
Prevention and Intervention: The Role of Front-line Services in Child Welfare

Kayla DeMong is the Coordinator for the 601 Family Support Program with AIDS Saskatoon. Kayla has a diploma in Addictions Counselling from SIIT. She has spent the last decade working front-line with youth, children, and families. Kayla’s passion and dedication to harm reduction and anti-oppressive practice is the driving force in her work.

Jamie DeVos
Jamie DeVos
October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Positive Parenting Program – Triple P in Saskatchewan

Jamie DeVos is employed by SIGN (Society for the Involvement of Good Neighbors). SIGN is a not-for-profit family and community service agency, which develops and delivers services to enhance the quality of life for individuals and groups in the Yorkton area. Jamie assumed the new role of Triple P – Positive Parenting Program Manager for the Yorkton & Fort Qu’Appelle areas in March 2014. Jamie’s background and experience in Psychology & Early Childhood Education has been an asset in this position. Her past employment working with vulnerable families and children with disabilities, as well as her work in child protection, has supported her in the Triple P Manager role.

As Manager of the Triple P Program in Yorkton & area, Jamie and her team of practitioners have supported over 1,500 people in accessing some level of Triple P programming since bringing this program to Yorkton in March 2014. Jamie credits their success to a vast number of agencies showing interest in the Triple P Program and partnering with SIGN – Triple P to offer programming. Jamie is especially proud of the partnership made with the Whitespruce Provincial Training Correctional Centre. Together, they were able to provide in-house Triple P to 12 of the dads, who are currently incarcerated, but wanting to know how to be a better dad once released.


Catherine Dickson
Catherine Dickson
October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:40 p.m.
STIs in Pregnancy: What to Screen For, When to Screen, and How to Manage Positive Cases

Dr. Catherine Dickson is a public health physician and field epidemiologist in the Public Health Agency of Canada’s Canadian Field Epidemiology Program. She is currently placed at the Saskatoon Health Region’s Public Health Observatory. Catherine completed her medical school training at McGill University and her residency training at the University of Ottawa. She holds Masters of Science degrees in both Epidemiology and Human Kinetics from the University of Ottawa, and has previously worked for the Public Health Agency of Canada in chronic disease surveillance and on the Canadian Guidelines on Sexually Transmitted Infections.

Bev Drew
Bev Drew
October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Dissecting a Motivational Interviewing Conversation

Bev Drew has a B.A.Sc. from the University of Guelph in Early Childhood Education, and a M.Sc. from Iowa State University in Human Development and Family Studies. She works as the FASD Prevention Coordinator for the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. Currently, most of her work involves delivering Motivational Interviewing (MI) training workshops across the province. Bev has also developed and nurtured the Saskatchewan MI Trainers to build capacity for MI training in the province. Bev is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT).

Amanda Frain
Amanda Frain
October 6, 2017 | 9:40 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
The Babies, Books, and Bonding Program in Northern Saskatchewan: A Health Promotion Strategy for Building Oral Language and Early Literacy Skills in Children 0-5 Years

Amanda Frain is a Population Health Promotion Practitioner, working with the Northern Saskatchewan Population Health Unit. In her role, Amanda spends much of her time coordinating the work of the Northern Healthy Communities Partnership, a network of organizations working proactively to improve the health of northern Saskatchewan residents. Amanda holds a Master of Science in Global Health from McMaster University and a Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry and Microbiology from the University of Saskatchewan. She is a certified Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Trainer. Amanda is passionate about working with communities, especially young people, to build on their strengths to create increased opportunities for health and well-being. She maintains strong interests in mental health, health systems, and community and leadership development. Outside of work, Amanda spends much of her time travelling, reading, baking, and hiking.

Delphine Gossner
Delphine Gossner
October 5, 2017 | 10:50 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Emerging Developments in Evidence-based Practices in Child Welfare: The role of proactive, data-driven, community safety interventions

Delphine Gossner holds a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and a M.Ed. in Educational Psychology, both from the University of Saskatchewan. Delphine has worked with the Government of Saskatchewan for approximately 25 years and is currently the Director, Research and Excellence in Policing within the Saskatchewan Ministry of Justice, Corrections and Policing. Prior to her current position, Delphine worked in the area of corrections for approximately 22 years, with the majority of that time spent with a team of individuals who specialized in the application of evidence-based correctional approaches at the practice level, including the evaluation of these approaches on outcomes such as reduced recidivism for Saskatchewan offender populations.

Erica Gray
Erica Gray
October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Dissecting a Motivational Interviewing Conversation

Erica Gray has a BSW and MSW from the University of Regina. She works as a Clinical Supervisor with Ranch Ehrlo Society’s Family Treatment Programs. Erica’s current employment focus supports families in making changes to better their functioning in the areas of parenting, substance use, interpersonal relationships, and preservation/reunification. Erica is a member of the Saskatchewan MI trainers.

Janet Hare
Janet Hare
October 5, 2017 | 11:20 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities’ Early Child Development and Primary Prevention Intervention Program and its Impact on Indigenous Children, Their Families, and Their Communities Across Canada

Janet Hare works with the Public Health Agency of Canada on the Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities program in a performance measurement capacity. She also works with researchers from universities and other governmental departments to provide additional research regarding healthy child development intervention and planning information for the AHSUNC program.

Connie Herman
Connie Herman
October 5, 2017 | 10:20 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Connect, Engage, Sustain: Strategies for Effective Family Programming

Connie Herman is the Saskatchewan coordinator for the Nobody’s Perfect Parenting Program, which has supported and educated parents throughout Canada for over 30 years. As a parent, Connie understands the difficulties and importance of parenting and is grateful to coordinate a program that enhances people’s capacity to raise happy, healthy children.

Hayley Kennedy
Hayley Kennedy
October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Positive Parenting Program – Triple P in Saskatchewan

Hayley Kennedy is the Executive Director of PARTNERS Family Services Inc., a non-profit organization based in Humboldt, SK. PARTNERS Family Services Inc. is a multi-funded agency committed to nurturing positive choices that sustain healthy individuals and communities through support, education, and partnerships. The agency takes a particular interest in working with individuals and families who have experienced family violence.

With 13 years of experience working in the non-profit sector in Ontario, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia, Hayley is an energetic activist with a particular interest in examining and utilizing existing resources in creative and innovative ways to meet the needs of vulnerable individuals and families. In her role as Executive Director, Hayley has worked to increase service provision in rural central Saskatchewan, expand services to isolated communities, increase advocacy services, and bring concerns from the rural service area to the provincial table. Hayley provides workshops to schools, employers, and other CBOs in the areas of mental health, interpersonal relationships, and family violence. Currently, Hayley sits on the Board of Directors for Saskatchewan Sexual Assault Services, Family Service Saskatchewan, and Provincial Association of Transition Houses of Saskatchewan.


Jacqueline Lim
Jacqueline Lim
October 6, 2017 | 9:40 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
The Babies, Books, and Bonding Program in Northern Saskatchewan: A Health Promotion Strategy for Building Oral Language and Early Literacy Skills in Children 0-5 Years

Jacqueline completed her training as a speech-language pathologist at Flinders University in Australia. She has worked in both rural and urban locations within Australia, and across a range of clinical areas such as speech sound disorders, paediatric language delays, autism, use of alternative and augmentative communication strategies, and swallowing disorders. Jacqueline has lived in Saskatchewan for six years and currently works as a speech-language pathologist with the Mamawetan Churchill River Health Region in La Ronge, Saskatchewan. She is also completing her PhD in Speech Pathology part time through the University of Sydney in parent and tutor training in the treatment of Childhood Apraxia of Speech. Jacqueline is passionate about building the capacity of parents and caregivers in developing the oral language skills of children.

Laurie McPherson
Laurie McPherson
October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Introduction to Handle with Care: Promoting the Mental Health of Young Children with Four Key Building Blocks

Laurie McPherson, RPN, MSc. is currently the Manager, Mental Health Promotion for the Winnipeg Health Region. The program focuses on building capacity for mental health promotion across the lifespan and in multiple settings such as healthcare services and programs, community agencies, schools, and post-secondary institutions. Laurie is passionate about promoting and creating opportunities for positive mental health and well-being across every stage of life. She is a Master Trainer for Handle with Care and was one of the original developers of the program, along with fellow developers from the Yukon, Ontario, and Prince Edward Island. “It has been a privilege to be a part of this national program and to partner with such a caring and committed group of collaborators.” Laurie is especially rewarded by hearing how parents of young children benefit from developing a strong connection to their child through simple everyday interactions.

B. Lee Murray
B. Lee Murray
October 6, 2017 | 9:40 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Sexual Health Information for Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities: Collaborative Interprofessional Practice

Lee Murray is currently an Associate Professor at the College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan. She is also a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) in adolescent mental health. Lee holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, a Masters in Nursing, and a PhD Education Administration from the University of Saskatchewan. Lee teaches in the area of adolescent mental health, individual and group counselling, interprofessional practice and leadership, and school health in context of the role of a mental health nurse in schools. Lee’s clinical practice and research involves working in schools with adolescents with developmental disabilities regarding sexual health education. She has a great interest and curiosity regarding “Mothering.” To satisfy this curiosity, Lee uses auto-ethnography as methodology to explore the normative discourse of mothering in the context of her own experiences as a mom.

Munier Nour
Munier Nour
October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 1:20 p.m.
Type 2 Diabetes: A Freight Train of Health Burden Affecting Saskatchewan Youth

Dr. Nour is division head of the Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes program in Saskatoon and is an Assistant Clinical Professor with the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Saskatchewan. He completed his medical training at the University of Calgary and subsequently trained within Pediatrics at Queen’s University, in Kingston, Ontario. Dr. Nour completed his fellowship in Pediatric Endocrinology at the Alberta Children’s Hospital, in Calgary and jointly completed his MSc in Medical Sciences and the Royal College Clinician Investigator Program training at the University of Calgary. Dr. Nour’s research interests include pediatric diabetes, bone health, and growth.

Johnmark Opondo
Johnmark Opondo
October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:40 p.m.
STIs in Pregnancy: What to Screen For, When to Screen, and How to Manage Positive Cases

Dr. Johnmark Opondo is the Deputy Medical Health Officer for Saskatoon Health Region, and has several years of work experience in public health and global health. He received his Master of Public Health training from Emory University, and has worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. Early in his career, Dr. Opondo worked in Kenya as a medical doctor, where he also served as a District Medical Health Officer in the city of Mombasa. Dr. Opondo has a background in reproductive health. Internationally, Dr. Opondo has worked in Kenya, Uganda, Southern Sudan, and Rwanda in Refugee Health Care. He was one of the leads in the implementation of the Saskatchewan HIV Strategy, which was charged with rolling out the Provincial HIV control strategy, and helped in the design of the Saskatchewan TB Control Strategy. Dr. Opondo has an interest in immigrant and refugee health care and has been working with several partners in Saskatoon.

Danna Ormstrup
Danna Ormstrup
October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Working with Hidden Disabilities…The Challenges and the Rewards

Danna Ormstrup, B.A. is the Executive Director of the Foothills Fetal Alcohol Society, located in High River, Alberta. She has had the privilege of supporting a variety of people in a myriad of settings and loves to share her experiences and passion for people with complicated behaviours. From recreational programs to in-home visitation, and inclusive employment placements to residential support, Danna is confident that experiential opportunities for learning that build empathy and understanding will lead to compassionate response in all interactions with all kinds of people.

Adel Panahi
Adel Panahi
October 5, 2017 | 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
SAYCW’s Inter-sectoral Approach in Promoting Youth Health and Well-being: Lessons Learned From Schools and Communities Partnerships

Adel Panahi works as the Community Action Coordinator for the Saskatchewan Alliance for Youth and Community Well-Being (SAYCW). His background is public administration, with more than ten years of experience in community empowerment and policy development. In his role, Adel supports schools and communities to translate their knowledge of youth health into action through community partnership and youth engagement.

Joey Panko
Joey Panko
October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Dissecting a Motivational Interviewing Conversation

Joey Panko has a Master Degree of Education from the University of Regina. He works as a Registered Psychologist at Ehrlo Counselling Services. Joey has a background of working with high-risk youth and currently works with individuals and families providing assessment and counselling. Joey is also a member of the Saskatchewan Motivational Interviewing Trainers.

Carmen Paterson-Payne
Carmen Paterson-Payne
October 5, 2017 | 10:20 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Connect, Engage, Sustain: Strategies for Effective Family Programming

Carmen is the Provincial Coordinator for Nobody’s Perfect Manitoba and is the Dad Central Manitoba representative. She is a Master Trainer for Nobody’s Perfect and is also a contract program developer and adult learning facilitator. Carmen’s background in Early Childhood and Adult and Continuing Education complements her work with families and program facilitators. She believes that respecting values and using participant-centered approaches to facilitation is a key when working with all cultures. Carmen has delivered workshops for a variety of organizations and conferences all across Canada.

Alan Rosenberg
Alan Rosenberg
October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
Discovering the Earliest Origins of Health and Disease: Intrauterine Inflammation as a Determinant of Future Disease

Dr. Rosenberg is a professor of Pediatrics, former Head of the Department of Pediatrics, and current Head of the Divisions of Rheumatology and Research, Department of Pediatrics, University of Saskatchewan. Since 1981, he has directed the Pediatric Rheumatology program in Saskatchewan and has directed the University of Saskatchewan’s Pediatric Rheumatic Disease Research Laboratory.

Dr. Rosenberg’s research includes transdisciplinary studies showing how genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors interact to influence the occurrence and outcomes of diseases. He leads and participates in research initiatives that contribute to characterizing the utility of biomarker profiling in childhood arthritis and studying how inflammation occurring during pregnancy can influence the occurrence of future inflammatory-mediated diseases.

Dr. Rosenberg advocates for transdisciplinary collaborations, involving biomedical and non-biomedical disciplines, to achieve the highest standards of clinical care and research for children and families. Dr. Rosenberg’s research is aimed at discovering the earliest origins of disease to guide and inform the development of disease prevention strategies.


Brian Russell
Brian Russell
October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
A Man to Count on: Exploring the Intersection of New Fatherhood and Domestic Violence

Brian Russell is the Provincial Coordinator for Dad Central Ontario, which is devoted to promoting responsible father involvement in Ontario and has acted as a catalyst for other provinces and territories within Canada to form their own regional father initiatives. He also runs a small counselling practice, where he focuses on supporting men, marriages, and families to have strong and safe relationships. Brian is married and has three beautiful daughters.

Joelle Schaefer
Joelle Schaefer
October 5, 2017 | 10:20 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.
Food Insecurity and the Feminine Struggles of Feeding a Family
October 5, 2017 | 11:20 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Food Insecurity and Pregnancy: Considerations for Implementation of the ‘Canadian Consensus on Female Nutrition: Adolescence, Reproduction, Menopause, and Beyond’

Joelle Schaefer is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Community Health & Epidemiology at the University of Saskatchewan. As a doctoral student, her research is centered on examining the issue of food insecurity and pregnancy in Saskatoon. Prior to graduate school, Joelle received her BSc. in Kinesiology from the University of Saskatchewan. Joelle has worked at the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute and the Saskatchewan Health Quality Council.

Tanis Shanks
Tanis Shanks
October 5, 2017 | 10:20 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Connect, Engage, Sustain: Strategies for Effective Family Programming

Tanis is the CAPC Training and Education Coordinator for the Saskatchewan Prevention Institute. For over a decade, Tanis has worked with parents and children in numerous capacities, including program development, facilitation, mentorship, child care, and administration. As a parent herself, Tanis is very passionate about parenting education, healthy child development, violence prevention, and human rights. Tanis also delivers trainings, presentations, and workshops around Saskatchewan on the Nobody’s Perfect Parenting Program, Positive Discipline in Everyday Parenting, Healthy Start/Depart Sante, and is the Dad Central Canada Representative for Saskatchewan.

Shelley Spurr
Shelley Spurr
October 5, 2017 | 1:20 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
Type 2 Diabetes in Canadian Aboriginal Youth: A Public Health Crisis?

Shelley Spurr, PhD is a Registered Nurse (RN) and has over 20 years of nursing experience, working in a variety of areas including acute care, public health, and home care. Dr. Spurr is now working as an Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research focuses on the promotion of wellness and interprofessional education (IPE), and emphasizes, specifically, the provision of holistic care including oral health, diabetes, and vision care, and the promotion of physical activity. Most recently, Dr. Spurr’s research includes developing prevention strategies and innovative approaches to screen for risk and complications of diabetes.

Keira C. Stockdale
Keira C. Stockdale
October 5, 2017 | 10:50 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Emerging Developments in Evidence-based Practices in Child Welfare: The role of proactive, data-driven, community safety interventions

Keira C. Stockdale obtained her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Saskatchewan and is a registered doctoral psychologist with the Saskatchewan College of Psychologists. Her doctoral research involved a psychometric evaluation of a violence risk assessment and treatment planning tool for youth – the Violence Risk Scale-Youth Version. Keira’s clinical experiences have included the provision of assessment and treatment services to violent and high-risk adult and young offenders in both institutional and community settings. She is currently employed with the Saskatoon Police Service and is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Saskatchewan.

Jennifer Stoneham
Jennifer Stoneham
October 5, 2017 | 10:50 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Emerging Developments in Evidence-based Practices in Child Welfare: The role of proactive, data-driven, community safety interventions

Jennifer Stoneham received B.S. degrees in Biology and Biochemistry, and a B.A degree in Psychology from the University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, in 2003. She received her Honours degree in Psychology from the University of Regina in 2005. Jennifer has been with the Government of Saskatchewan, Ministry of Social Services since 2005 and is currently a Planning and Performance Management Consultant with the Research and Evidence Based Excellence Branch. In this role, Jennifer works closely with Child and Family Services, focusing mainly on analytics and visualization tools to improve outcomes for vulnerable children.

Hortense Nsoh Tabien
Hortense Nsoh Tabien
October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:40 p.m.
STIs in Pregnancy: What to Screen For, When to Screen, and How to Manage Positive Cases

Dr. Hortense Nsoh Tabien is currently in her final year of residency/fellowship training in Public Health and Preventive Medicine (PHPM). Dr. Tabien completed her Medical degree at the University of Milan, Italy and holds a PhD degree in Anatomy and Cell Biology from the University of Saskatchewan. Her professional interests involve the vulnerable populations, including immigrant and refugee health, travel medicine, women’s health, and physician health. She is a mother of adorable twin boys, whom she describes as “her sunshine” and who give her the drive to do all. She likes to read science fiction novels. Her hobbies include jogging, football (soccer) and dancing.

Christina Tarko
Christina Tarko
October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Understanding and Working with Traumatized and Maltreated Children

Christina Tarko is a registered psychologist who has lived in Saskatoon since attending the University of Saskatchewan to complete an M.A., majoring in psychology, and a Master’s Degree in Educational Psychology. Christina previously worked with the Young Offender population through North Battleford Child and Youth Services. Currently, she works for the Saskatoon Health Region in Children’s Mental Health Services (CMHS), Behavioural Consultation Services (BCS) program. The majority of the referral project for this program is toddlers and preschoolers.

Through Christina’s previous experiences, she has gained experience in doing assessments, individual counselling, as well as therapy work with children and their families. Christina regularly uses consultation and coaching skills in supporting care providers and educators to best support a child’s behavioural, social, and emotional development.


David Torr
David Torr
October 5, 2017 | 10:20 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.
Radon Home Health Study: Risk of Radon Exposure in Households with Children in Southwest Saskatchewan
October 5, 2017 | 2:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Title: TBA

Dr. David Torr, a physician in Saskatchewan with over three decades of experience in the medical field, has a strong passion for health and prevention.

His experience covers parts of Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America, and has had training at the universities of London, Makerere, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Saskatchewan, as well as the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the former Canadian Emergency Measures College.

In Saskatchewan, he has worked as a Medical Health Officer from as far back as 1991, for the City of Saskatoon, Swift Current and Saskatoon when districts, and in more recent years, in a number of regions, most especially in the south west part of the province.

He is also an associate clinical professor at the University of Saskatchewan, and current chair of the Medical Health Officers’ Council of Saskatchewan.


Lindsay Tumback
Lindsay Tumback
October 5, 2017 | 10:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.
Healthy Nutrition and Gestational Weight Gain in Pregnancy

Lindsay Tumback, RD, MSc is a Registered Dietitian from Saskatoon and currently works as a Research Assistant at the College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan. Lindsay’s interests are in clinical nutrition research and women’s health. She was a member of the expert panel and co-author of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada’s Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Canadian Consensus on Female Nutrition: Adolescence, Reproduction, Menopause, and Beyond.

Kevin Wasko
Kevin Wasko
October 4, 2017 | 2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
C-Section Births in Rural Mothers: Improving Care with Multidisciplinary Teams and Mixed Methods

Dr. Kevin Wasko, MA, MD, CCFP is a family physician practicing in Swift Current, Saskatchewan. He earned a BA in political science from Dalhousie University and an MA in political science from the University of Calgary. Dr. Wasko worked in medical administration with the Cypress Health Region and then worked as an assistant to the Minister of Health of Saskatchewan prior to attending Medical School at the University of Calgary, receiving his MD in 2011. He completed his residency in Family Medicine through the University of Saskatchewan’s rural training site in Swift Current in 2013. Dr. Wasko practices full scope family medicine, works shifts in the emergency department, and provides obstetrical care. A Clinical Assistant Professor with the University of Saskatchewan, Dr. Wasko is involved in teaching family medicine residents and medical students. In addition to clinical work, he is interested in quality improvement and physician leadership initiatives, sitting on several committees of the Saskatchewan Medical Association and Ministry of Health.

Brandy Winquist
Brandy Winquist
October 4, 2017 | 2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
C-Section Births in Rural Mothers: Improving Care with Multidisciplinary Teams and Mixed Methods
October 5, 2017 | 10:20 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.
Radon Home Health Study: Risk of Radon Exposure in Households with Children in Southwest Saskatchewan

Dr. Brandy Winquist is a PhD-trained epidemiologist specializing in the areas of maternal and child health, health services research, and population health. Much of her work over the past eight years has been used to inform, evaluate, and improve health service delivery in southwest Saskatchewan. Brandy has co-led several provincial and community-based research projects on topics relating to maternal-child health. To promote action in southwest Saskatchewan, she co-founded and chairs the Growing Healthy Families Coalition. Working with the Health Quality Council and the Canadian Network for Observational Drug Effects Studies, Brandy has led the Saskatchewan component of three multi-province studies investigating prescription medication use during pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes. Her doctoral dissertation (College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan) examined the utilization of prenatal screening in Saskatchewan, and its ethical and policy implications. As chair of the Cypress Regional Ethics Committee, she continues to study the field of applied clinical and research ethics.

Session Descriptions / Abstracts

Each concurrent session fits within one of the following four streams: Public Health, Child Maltreatment, Maternal & Infant Health, and Resources & Skill Development. Delegates may attend sessions from any of the streams.


Keynote SessionsConcurrent Sessions
October 4, 2017 | 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Children’s Health: Standing Together
Dr. David Torr, Chair, Medical Health Officers Council of Saskatchewan
Dr. Juliet Soper, Pediatrician and Head Department of Pediatrics, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region
Dr. George Carson, Senior Medical Officer and Maternal Fetal Medicine, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region
Dr. James Irvine, Medical Health Officer, Northern Saskatchewan Health Regions (Athabasca Health Authority, Keewatin Yatthé, and Mamawetan Churchill River Health Regions)

Saskatchewan experts will address three streams of the conference – public health, child maltreatment, and maternal and infant health. The first three speakers will address the current issues and trends in their areas of expertise. The final speaker will address the importance of prevention, the interconnection of the streams, and the vital roles that conference delegates play in improving the health of children and families.


October 4, 2017 | 4:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saskatchewan’s Advocate for Children and Youth
Corey O’Soup, Advocate for Children and Youth, Saskatoon, SK

Following Charlene Bearhead’s presentation, Corey O’Soup, Saskatchewan’s Advocate for Children and Youth, will discuss his vision for how the Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission can be answered in this province. He will share initiatives of the Advocate’s Office and outline how the Advocate can support others in achieving a better Saskatchewan for its children.


October 5, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Supporting Children and Families in Communities of Compassionate Practice: Trauma-Informed Approach
Dr. Linda O’Neill, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC

Trauma-informed practice is a systems approach designed to better support the people we serve (clients\patients – children, youth, and adults) and their families who may have experienced adverse events in their lives, particularly early events resulting in various presentations and needs, supported and served through health and social services. Trauma-informed practice does not require specific disclosure of trauma; rather, it is a systems-wide lens focusing on safe practices and healthy relationships to assist with children, youth, and adults living lives less defined by traumatic experiences.

Understanding the importance of safety and the power of relationships in establishing or re-establishing stability after adverse childhood events, including interpersonal abuse, severe attachment disruption, or neglect, is a major theme throughout this presentation. Increasing compassion for clients, colleagues, and helpers is another theme addressed using a trauma-informed lens.

Learning Objectives:
  • To explore a trauma-informed approach and the need for compassionate communities and the fit to the Truth and Reconciliation calls to action.

October 5, 2017 | 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Raising the Selfie Generation: Social Media, Mental Health, and Digital Citizenship
Dr. Alec Couros, Faculty of Education, University of Regina, Regina, SK

In this presentation, Dr. Alec Couros will lead participants through an in-depth exploration of the digital world of today’s youth, including both the challenges and affordances that have become so common in our connected reality. In particular, participants will learn about the complex challenges facing children with respect to mental health and well-being, and they will develop an understanding of ways in which to support youth as they navigate challenges such as bullying, peer pressure, social comparison, and sexting. Additionally, participants will be introduced to strategies for addressing the complexities of digital footprints and identity in a digital age. Finally, participants will gain a better understanding of how they might empower youth to develop as positive digital citizens and to become “upstanders” both on and offline.

Learning Objectives:
Participants will develop a greater understanding of the following:
  • The digital realities of children’s lives
  • Specific challenges related to mental health and well-being
  • Techniques and strategies to help youth, parents, and caregivers overcome these challenges
  • Strategies for empowering young people to use technology in positive and productive ways that support their learning and development

October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Stream: Public Health
Social Inclusion as Prevention
Saskatoon Open Door Society, Saskatoon, SK

Migration brings with it a host of challenges, and when it involves families, these challenges can be a deleterious stressor on overall family cohesion. Developing insight into the experiences of immigrant families can be an asset for service providers in developing culturally responsive and preventative programs tolls for refugee youth and families.


October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Stream: Child Maltreatment
Positive Parenting Program – Triple P in Saskatchewan
Hayley Kennedy, PARTNERS Family Services Inc., Humboldt, SK
Jamie DeVos, SIGN (Society for the Involvement of Good Neighbors), Yorkton, SK

Positive Parenting Program – Triple P is an evidenced-based parenting program used in more than 25 countries across the globe. Based on the extent of its evidence base, Triple P is number one on the United Nations’ ranking of parenting programs.

A multi-level family intervention and parenting support strategy, Triple P is designed to reduce behavioural and emotional issues in children and adolescents. Triple P consists of five levels of intervention in a model which aims to support and guide parents in self-sufficiency when it comes to interacting with their children, whether there are presenting behavioural challenges or not. This proactive approach to parenting empowers parents with practical tools and intervention strategies to communicate with their children in a healthy way.

In Saskatchewan, Triple P has been made available to families in urban centers, rural communities, and First Nations communities. Practitioners have used the Triple P Program in innovative ways to work with families to address their concerns regarding their children’s behaviours in a healthy way, and to reduce incidents of child maltreatment. Groups allow parents to normalize their children’s behaviours and see that they are not alone when it comes to the behaviours they may be seeing in their children.

The program uses a variety of methods for programming, including presentations, problem-solving skills, role rehearsal, videos, group discussions, and peer mentoring, making it accessible to a variety of learning styles. Triple P has also been established as an effective companion program to other family support programs organizations may be offering such as in-home family supports, outreach services, and drop-in play groups.

As a well-established program with proven data collection methods, Triple P in Saskatchewan has been able to establish the following positive outcomes for participants:

Based on the work of Dr. Bruce Perry and the ChildTrauma Academy, this workship will:
  • Families relying less on intensive human services providers
  • Families are able to identify and have improved access to community supports and services
  • Families are able to effectively communicate, resolve conflict, and problem solve
  • Parent have improved knowledge of child development and how to interact with their children in a safe and healthy way

October 4, 2017 | 2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Stream: Child Maltreatment
Reaching Thriving Recovery: A Grounded Theory of Parent Responses to Child Interpersonal Trauma
Jorden Cummings, Department of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Child interpersonal trauma (i.e., trauma perpetuated by another human) occurs at disturbingly high rates. When a child experiences trauma, the entire family system is impacted; non-offending parents serve as modulators of child responses to trauma and have a strong impact on child functioning post-trauma. However, very little is known about parent responses to child trauma, beyond research documenting that parents experience distress post-trauma.

The purpose of this project was to develop an inductive theory of parental response to child interpersonal trauma, using a grounded theory approach. Fourteen parents (11 mothers, 3 fathers) completed semi-structured interviews of their experiences following their child’s trauma (e.g., sexual abuse, physical abuse, domestic violence, neglect, assault). A core construct, “Providing Protection” was identified. This captured a 3-stage model of a parent response process. The first stage was marked by parents’ violated expectations regarding trauma occurrence, responses of associated social agencies, and parents themselves. In the second stage, parents focused on finding the right way to meet their child’s needs, which included continual application of helping strategies and constant evaluation of those strategies. Parents aimed to place their child in a protective space, which had both helpful and unhelpful consequences for child victims. Lastly, parents reached a “new normal,” which was associated with positive family experiences such as improved communication, increased closeness amongst family members, and increased confidence in the strength of the family unit. Each of these stages was necessary for positive resolution of parents’ responses to child trauma; parents who did not achieve this full process were more likely to experience negative outcomes as was their child. Implications for interventions for families impacted by trauma will also be discussed.


October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
Where Are We Now? Update on the Initiatives of the MotherFirst Maternal Mental Health Strategy in Saskatchewan
Dr. Angela Bowen, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Anxiety and depression are serious problems for up to 20% of pregnant and postpartum women, with potentially serious effects for the mother and her entire family.

The MotherFirst Strategy for Maternal Mental Health was developed by a provincial working group of healthcare professionals and public representatives to address gaps in education, screening, and services in Saskatchewan. The strategy was endorsed by the Minister of Health in 2010. Since that time, a number of initiatives have been implemented to improve maternal mental health.

This presentation will update participants on the latest MotherFirst initiatives and those in progress. This will include the Maternal Mental Health Toolkit resource, depression and anxiety screening in pregnancy and postpartum, and intervention options available in the province.


October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Stream: Resources & Skill Development
Children See – Children Learn
Louise Choquette, Best Start Resource Centre, Toronto, ON

In the fall of 2015, the Best Start Resource Centre launched a province-wide campaign in Ontario on child discipline. The goal of the campaign was to reduce the prevalence of physical and emotional punishment of children from birth to age 6. In order to ensure that the messages and strategies for this campaign were evidence-based, the following research components were undertaken: key informant interviews; an environmental scan of other campaigns; identification of best practices for child discipline; a parent survey; and a service provider needs assessment. The session will provide highlights of this research, offer an overview of the campaign components available to service providers to assist parents in using developmentally appropriate strategies to guide their child’s behaviour from birth to age 6, and provide some evaluation data. Participants will be able to use the materials available for Children See – Children Learn in their communities. The main element of the campaign is a website available to all.


October 4, 2017 | 1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
Maternal Depression in Syrian Refugee Women Recently Moved to Canada: A Preliminary Study
Asma Ahmed, MPH student, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Background: Refugee women are almost five times more likely to develop postpartum depression than Canadian-born women. This can be attributed to various difficulties they faced before coming to Canada, as well as during resettlement. Moreover, refugee women usually face many obstacles when accessing health services, including language and cultural barriers, as well as unique help-seeking behaviours that are influenced by various cultural and practical factors. There has been a recent, rapid influx of Syrian refugees to Canada, and many of them are childbearing women. However, little is known about the experiences that these women have encountered pre- and post-resettlement, and their perceptions of mental health issues. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand refugee women’s experiences of having a baby in Canada from a mental health perspective.

Methods: A mixed methods research design included 12 Syrian refugee women who migrated to Saskatoon in 2015-16 and who were either pregnant or one year postpartum. The data was collected via focus group discussion and a structured questionnaire.


October 4, 2017 | 2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
C-Section Births in Rural Mothers: Improving Care with Multidisciplinary Teams and Mixed Methods
Dr. Brandy Winquist, Cypress Health Region, Swift Current, SK
Dr. Kevin Wasko, Associate Family Physicians Clinic, Swift Current, SK

Increasing and high Caesarean birth rates are a concern in Canada and in most developed nations. In 2009, routine maternal and infant health status reporting in the Cypress Health Region identified an elevated Caesarean section (CS) birth rate. Attempts were made to raise awareness among clinicians and to implement improvements, with limited success. In 2011-12, the age-adjusted overall rate in Cypress was almost two times as high as the provincial rate (44% vs 23%, respectively), and represented an increasing trend.

An applied clinical study was designed in partnership with a local delivering physician and the University of Saskatchewan Family Medicine Residency Program. All births at the Cypress Regional Hospital, during the years 2006 and 2012 (n=622), were studied through a chart audit. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were completed, identifying risk and protective factors for planned and emergency CS births. Parity, labour induction, prior CS delivery, rupture of membranes >24 hours, and breech presentation (>36 weeks) were significant predictors of unplanned CS births. In addition, the Robson method was applied to the data, which highlighted the higher-than-expected CS rate in low-risk mothers undergoing induction of labour. Provider type was not predictive of emergent CS procedures. Results were shared with the local Multidisciplinary Obstetrics Committee and other stakeholders. A multi-pronged quality improvement plan was designed and included: (1) a Vaginal Birth After Caesarean (VBAC) provider and public education initiative; (2) ongoing surveillance and reporting on improvement metrics; (3) evaluation of pregnancy induction practices and focus on best practice guidelines; and (4) participation in the Salus Global more OB™ program. Improvement work is ongoing, but the overall, unadjusted CS rate declined by seven percentage points between 2012 and 2015, and by five points in mothers having a first-time procedure. A detailed reanalysis of 2014 and 2015 births is underway, and will be presented.


October 5, 2017 | 10:20 p.m. – 10:50 p.m.
Stream: Public Health
Radon Home Health Study: Risk of Radon Exposure in Households with Children in Southwest Saskatchewan
Brandy Winquist, Cypress Health Region, Swift Current, SK
Dr. David Torr, Chair, Medical Health Officers Council of Saskatchewan

Radon is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas. It has no smell, odour, or taste, leading to the lack of awareness of its existence among the majority of Canadians. According to the World Health Organization, radon gas is the most common naturally occurring source of ionizing radiation. Although the concentration of radon outdoors can be low, it can enter indoor spaces through cracks, leaks, and other openings in floors and walls, reaching high levels in indoor air. The risk of developing lung cancer increases with radon concentration and duration of exposure. While lung cancer is exceedingly rare in children, exposure to radon during the early years increases the lifetime risk of developing lung cancer. A child living in a home with very high radon concentrations for only a short time may also have the equivalent risk of developing lung cancer as a lifetime exposure to moderate radon concentration. High levels of radon in households must be identified and mitigation strategies put into place to reduce risk. Based on a residential radon survey done by Health Canada, Saskatchewan has the highest national rate of households with elevated radon levels (15.9% vs. 6.7% nationally), and the rate was highest in southwest Saskatchewan (26%).

Using traditional and social media, the Radon Home Health Study (RHHS) enrolled 180 households with children throughout southwest Saskatchewan. Participation included the completion of a questionnaire, home testing, counselling by a Public Health Inspector, and a follow-up interview. Geospatial mapping of radon risk levels is underway. Of all households tested, 42.7% had radon levels above the Health Canada recommendation. One-third of households had at least one family member sleeping in the basement, where radon levels are typically highest. Ongoing public education to increase public awareness of radon and support for radon mitigation is key to lowering families’ risk for radon-attributable lung cancer.


October 5, 2017 | 10:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.
Stream: Public Health
CHAMPS: Children’s Healthy-Heart and Activity Monitoring Program in Saskatchewan
Tim Bradley, Pediatrics, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, SK

Congenital heart defects (CHD) are among the world’s leading birth anomalies. Prevalence is estimated at 8-10/1,000 live births. Survival rates are steadily increasing, paralleling advancements in surgical treatments. Children with CHD can have abnormal arterial growth and development, producing increased arterial stiffness, a well-established risk factor for early-onset cardiovascular disease. These children can also be of smaller stature, less physically active, and at risk for mental health issues. Emerging evidence shows that children with CHD grow up to be adults with much higher healthcare costs, and morbidity and mortality rates than the general population. Currently, no chronic disease management program addresses these health needs of the ~2,400 affected children across Saskatchewan.


October 5, 2017 | 10:20 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
Food Insecurity and the Feminine Struggles of Feeding a Family
Joelle Schaefer, Ph.D. student, Community Health & Epidemiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Between 2014 and 2017, a multi-method study was conducted to examine food insecurity and pregnancy in Saskatoon. Working closely with a prenatal support program, Healthy Mother Healthy Baby (HMHB), the issue was examined from multiple perspectives. This presentation will focus on a qualitative study that was carried out as part of this process. Interviews conducted with 10 women who accessed HMHB support services provide an understanding of the responsibilities which shape women’s experiences of food insecurity in a household with others. Interviews also discussed the role of support, including family, friends, and programs such as HMHB, in feeding these women and their families. This presentation will explore the results from the interviews and compare these to existing literature on women’s roles in feeding a family.

Women who access HMHB experience health and social disadvantage to achieving a healthy pregnancy, such as poverty, food insecurity, addictions, and others. The voices of these women, and others who access health- and social-based programming, are a valuable contribution to program evaluation, yet these voices are often missing. The presentation will discuss how the context of our lives cannot be ignored when attempting to understand effectiveness of programs and services that we access. The session attendees, through a facilitated reflective process, will begin to think about how the evaluations they conduct, as well as the interactions they have, with clients, can become more effective through efforts to understand the context in which people live.


October 5, 2017 | 10:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
Radon Home Health Study: Risk of Radon Exposure in Households with Children in Southwest Saskatchewan
Lindsay Tumback, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK
Dr. Angela Bowen, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Background: This presentation will review the 2016 recommendations for healthy nutrition in pregnancy and gestational weight gain from the “Canadian Consensus on Female Nutrition: Adolescence, Reproduction, and Menopause” by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologist of Canada (SOGC). Nutrients of special concern during pregnancy, such as iron, folate, choline, omega-3 fatty acids, and iodine will also be discussed.

Review process: Following librarian-led searches, a working group of experts from across Canada reviewed published literature, governmental and health agency reports, clinical practice guidelines, grey literature, and textbook sources to develop the recommendations. Optimal nutrition through the female life cycle was evaluated by a multidisciplinary group over a two-year span. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.

Implications for practice: Healthcare providers will be able to promote health in pregnant women using the most current evidence-based nutrition recommendations.


October 5, 2017 | 10:50 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
Healthy Nutrition and Gestational Weight Gain in Pregnancy
Lindsay Tumback, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK
Dr. Angela Bowen, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Background: This presentation will review the 2016 recommendations for healthy nutrition in pregnancy and gestational weight gain from the “Canadian Consensus on Female Nutrition: Adolescence, Reproduction, and Menopause” by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologist of Canada (SOGC). Nutrients of special concern during pregnancy, such as iron, folate, choline, omega-3 fatty acids, and iodine will also be discussed. Review process: Following librarian-led searches, a working group of experts from across Canada reviewed published literature, governmental and health agency reports, clinical practice guidelines, grey literature, and textbook sources to develop the recommendations. Optimal nutrition through the female life cycle was evaluated by a multidisciplinary group over a two-year span. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Implications for practice: Healthcare providers will be able to promote health in pregnant women using the most current evidence-based nutrition recommendations.


October 5, 2017 | 11:20 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Stream: Public Health
Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities’ Early Child Development and Primary Prevention Intervention Program and its Impact on Indigenous Children, Their Families, and Their Communities Across Canada
Janet Hare, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON
Stephanie Cerutti, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON

The Public Health Agency of Canada and its large-scale primary prevention policy intervention of the Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities’ (AHSUNC) program that provides culturally appropriate early child development programs for First Nations, Inuit and Métis children (3-5 years old) and their families living off-reserve, in urban and northern communities across Canada, will be highlighted in this presentation. The six guiding program components of Indigenous culture and languages, education, health promotion, nutrition, social support, and parental and family involvement, will be described and linked to performance measurement results describing program delivery and impact. The impacts of the AHSUNC program will be examined for children, their families, in addition to the 134 communities in which the program sites operate across Canada. Insight into community-based promising practices, addressing unique needs of AHSUNC site communities will also be gained by attendees.


October 5, 2017 | 11:20 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
Food Insecurity and Pregnancy: Considerations for Implementation of the ‘Canadian Consensus on Female Nutrition: Adolescence, Reproduction, Menopause, and Beyond’
Joelle Schaefer, Ph.D. student, Community Health & Epidemiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

The Consensus Statement is a clinical practice guideline to optimize nutrition throughout the life course. Although the consensus examines the life course of women, this presentation will focus on the prenatal and perinatal period. A primary reason women’s nutrition is scrutinized during this time, is the relationship between an infant’s health and the diet of a woman during pregnancy. It is now understood that nutrition leading up to pregnancy, and not only during pregnancy, will influence an infant’s health. This is an underlying message throughout the consensus statement. This presentation will discuss the realities of food insecurity, along with other health and social inequities that exist in Saskatchewan, and how these may impact the implementation of the guidelines. This presentation applies directly to the application of best evidence regarding current and emerging issues that impact the outcome of pregnancy for both the woman and infant.

Background on food insecurity: Food insecurity is the lack of access (physical, social, and economic) to food that meets the dietary needs and food preferences for a healthy and active life. In Saskatchewan, 10.6% households experienced food insecurity in 2014. Individuals living in food insecure households may experience worry about food running out, may compromise quantity and/or quality of food that is consumed, and may have disrupted eating patterns including hunger. Socioeconomic status is highly related to food insecurity, with lower household incomes, lower education levels, reliance on income-assistance (i.e., social assistance or employment insurance), single female-led households, and populations self-identifying as black and Aboriginal at an increased risk. Populations that are disproportionately impacted by food insecurity also experience other health and social inequities which influence their ability to achieve healthy pregnancies.


October 5, 2017 | 10:20 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Stream: Resources & Skill Development
Connect, Engage, Sustain: Strategies for Effective Family Programming
Connie Herman, Nobody’s Perfect Parenting Program, Saskatchewan Prevention Institute, Saskatoon, SK
Tanis Shanks, Community Action Program for Children, Saskatchewan Prevention Institute, Saskatoon, SK
Carmen Paterson-Payne, Nobody’s Perfect Parenting Program, Youville Centre, Winnipeg, MB

This is a hands-on, interactive workshop for service providers who deliver family programming. The benefits of family programming will be highlighted, along with some key insights into how to develop, promote, and maintain family programs in your community.


October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 1:20 p.m.
Stream: Public Health
Type 2 Diabetes: A Freight Train of Health Burden Affecting Saskatchewan Youth
Dr. Munier Nour, Department of Pediatrics, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, SK

Previously referred to as ‘adult onset diabetes’, type 2 diabetes is a preventable disease characterized by insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency and is now routinely diagnosed in childhood. Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents represents a major clinical problem, and is fueled largely by an epidemic in childhood obesity and compounded by inadequate primary and secondary prevention strategies. The full burden of pediatric obesity and type 2 diabetes in Saskatchewan is yet to be realized, with very concerning data emerging, particularly among aboriginal groups. This burden is multiplied by a host of issues, including prenatal exposures, genetic risk factors, inadequate education, lack of access to health care, and limited availability of nutritious food. Rates of pediatric type 2 diabetes have been rapidly increasing, carrying a host of complications and comorbidities which have been shown to present very early compared with adults. These include diabetes related kidney disease, nerve disease, and eye disease, as well as associated conditions of obstructive sleep apnea, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and hypercholesterolemia. Early, provincial-wide, interdisciplinary intervention with community engagement is required to prevent the growing health burden and alter the momentum of this epidemic.


October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Stream: Child Maltreatment
Understanding and Working with Traumatized and Maltreated Children
Barb Afseth and Christina Tarko, Children’s Mental Health Services, Saskatoon, SK
Based on the work of Dr. Bruce Perry and the ChildTrauma Academy, this workship will:
  • define and discuss the impact of early adverse experiences and poor relational health on brain development in children
  • share key principles of brain development
  • translate how early adverse experiences can impact the child’s behaviour including the ability to attach in relationships and the ability to self-regulate

Based on information discussed earlier in the workshop, Barb and Christina will discuss the strategies that adults in the children’s lives can use to support their healthy development (caregivers, daycare staff, and teachers).


October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
Dissecting a Motivational Interviewing Conversation
Bev Drew, Saskatchewan Prevention Institute, Saskatoon, SK
Erica Gray, Ranch Ehrlo Society’s Family Treatment Program, Regina, SK
Joey Panko, Ranch Ehrlo Counselling Services, Regina, SK

Participants will learn about the four processes that create a Motivational Interviewing (MI) conversation; the essential philosophy required to have the conversation successfully, and some of the core communication skills needed.

Within live demonstrations of MI conversations, participants will have an opportunity to see and discuss the process and elements of MI. The presenters will demonstrate conversations aimed at preventing an alcohol-exposed pregnancy. The conversations will be stopped occasionally for explanation and group discussion.


October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Stream: Resources & Skill Development
Working with Hidden Disabilities…The Challenges and the Rewards
Danna Ormstrup, Foothills Fetal Alcohol Society, High River, AB

Ever feel like you are giving good information, supporting with great strategies and interventions, but are not seeing the results you expected? It might be a hidden issue in brain function!

In this workshop, participants will be invited to have the opportunity to explore a variety of executive functioning issues through interactive “Brain Games” designed to promote empathy and understanding. This workshop not only looks at those complicated behaviours of the people with whom you work, but also encourages examination of learning styles and preferences and how they affect outcomes.

Join Danna on a journey around brains and learn about executive functioning and its effect on behaviour. You will be surprised, inspired, and committed to continued passion for the work they do!


October 5, 2017 | 1:20 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
Stream: Public Health
Type 2 Diabetes in Canadian Aboriginal Youth: A Public Health Crisis?
Dr. Shelley Spurr, Dr. Jill Bally, and Dr. Carol Bullin, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Background: An estimated 422 million people worldwide were living with diabetes in 2014; this represents a four-fold increase over the estimated 108 million in 1980, and this number is expected to climb to 552 million by 2030. Type 2 diabetes has become increasingly prevalent in children and youth, and Canadian Aboriginal (First Nation, Metis, and Inuit) children are disproportionately affected by diabetes and related complications which are emerging as serious public health concerns. Although a number of studies have examined the projected incidence rates and potential risk factors for type 2 diabetes in the adolescent population, the true prevalence rate of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes is underestimated.

Purpose: To investigate the risk factors and prevalence rates of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes among northern Canadian Aboriginal adolescents.

Methods: In this novel quantitative study, 160 high school students (aged 13-20) from three northern, predominantly Canadian Aboriginal communities were screened for risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Screening included demographic data, family history, anthropometrical measurements, blood pressure, and A1C.

Results: At least half of the adolescents presented with multiple risk factors for type 2 diabetes including Aboriginal ancestry, family history, overweight/obesity, and hypertension. In this sample, 10% had an A1C greater than 5.7%, 22.5% were overweight, 17.5% were obese, and 26.6% had hypertension or prehypertension.

Conclusions: Prediabetes is emerging as a serious health concern for young Aboriginal Canadians. What is troubling is that prediabetes and type 2 diabetes result from modifiable risk factors. These findings underscore the necessity for early screening of Aboriginal youth for both prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Recommendations toward positive health outcomes include interventions that are specific to the modifiable risk factors (overweight/obesity and hypertension). This has the potential to prevent the progression to diabetes and reduce complications related to type 2 diabetes.


October 5, 2017 | 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Stream: Public Health
SAYCW’s Inter-sectoral Approach in Promoting Youth Health and Well-being: Lessons Learned From Schools and Communities Partnerships
Adel Panahi, Saskatchewan Alliance for Youth and Community Well-Being (SAYCW), Saskatoon, SK

SAYCW is an alliance of health, education, and other community stakeholders dedicated to improving the health and well-being of the Saskatchewan population. Its mission is to improve youth and community well-being through the action of community partners working together, measured and supported by a collaborative provincial population health promotion system.

In 2015, SAYCW conducted a Youth Health Survey in 116 schools, to capture information about the current health and well-being of youth in grades 7 to 12 in Saskatchewan. Among all promising results, there are some concerning issues. The survey results indicate that 37% of youth do not feel involved in their community, 41% of students had been bullied at least once in the past month, 19% of students had considered suicide in the past year, and half of those who had considered it, had also attempted suicide during that time. Also, 38% of male and 59% of female students had felt so sad or hopeless within the last year that they had stopped their regular activities for a while.

To help schools and communities address these issues, SAYCW supports schools and communities in translating their knowledge into action through mobilizing available resources and expertise in Community Action Teams (CATs) and facilitating School-CAT collaborations. In addition to facilitating inter-sectoral collaborations in community level, SAYCW offers grants for schools and communities to develop and implement their actions based on the survey results. Through this grant and with an inter-sectoral approach, schools and community organizations have planned their actions to address their prioritized issues.


October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:40 p.m.
Stream: Public Health
STIs in Pregnancy: What to Screen For, When to Screen, and How to Manage Positive Cases
Dr. Catherine Dickson, Canadian Field Epidemiology Program, Public Health Agency of Canada, Saskatoon, SK
Hortense Nsoh Tabien, Residency/Fellowship Training, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK
Dr. Johnmark Opondo, Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon, SK

Rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis are on the rise in Saskatchewan. In addition, HIV rates in Saskatchewan remain above the Canadian average. Pregnancy is an important time to screen for STIs, and the appropriate management of a pregnant woman diagnosed with an STI helps prevent potentially serious consequences in the neonate. This workshop will provide an overview of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis, with a particular focus on pregnant women and newborn infants. Discussion will include local epidemiology of STIs, screening tests, and the interpretation of these test results and management of STIs. A number of case studies will be presented, which participants will work through during the session. This workshop is targeted towards healthcare providers who provide prenatal care.


October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Stream: Child Maltreatment
A Man to Count on: Exploring the Intersection of New Fatherhood and Domestic Violence
Brian Russell, Dad Central Ontario, Toronto, ON

There is a growing body of evidence confirming that healthy child development is impacted by father involvement. Becoming a father can be a stressful time as men adapt to their new role and as the relationship with mom changes. This stress can lead to an increase in a variety of forms of domestic violence, meaning that too many children are exposed to violence within the home, either as witnesses or recipients. How fathers manage their anger, handle their expectations around the family, and relate with their partner is setting an example for his children. Therefore, for our children’s sake, it is imperative that we develop an understanding of the issues surrounding domestic violence and fatherhood. Further, we must build our capacity to respond to families in appropriate and effective ways. “A Man to Count on” discusses how domestic violence intersects with new fatherhood. The key objectives are: 1) foster a general understanding of how fatherhood is impacted by domestic violence; 2) deepen knowledge of how becoming a father affects a man; 3) understand the three levels of support fathers need and how to respond to each; 4) outline the key elements of healthy fatherhood and healthy relationship principles; and 5) share resources and best practices that support the engagement of fathers and families influenced by domestic violence. In general, this highly interactive workshop will build capacity to meet the needs of children, fathers, and families struggling with the harmful reality of violence.


October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
Stream: Child Maltreatment
Prevention and Intervention: The Role of Front-line Services in Child Welfare
Kayla DeMong, 601 Family Support Program, AIDS Saskatoon, Saskatoon, SK

In partnership with the Saskatchewan Ministry of Social Services, AIDS Saskatoon Family Support Program began as a pilot in 2011. The partnership is unique, as the Ministry of Social Services created the concept for the program and approached AIDS Saskatoon to house it. The Ministry was looking for alternative options to support families where neglect and substance use had been identified as barriers to parenting. The program’s objective is to provide emergency after-hours intensive in-home support to families in crisis, to ensure the personal safety of children while allowing them to remain within the family home. AIDS Saskatoon has taken their core value of Harm Reduction and applied it to a child welfare setting to work with families in a preventative manner that decreases the risk of apprehension. Family Support is an outreach-based service that operates 365 days a year until midnight. Families’ ‘files’ never close, so the program is able to create long-term relationships, which allow families to build trust and feel safe to access support when in crisis. Since the program began in 2011, over 900 families (over 2,000 children) have been referred to the Family Suppport Program. As a result, families they support (who had been identified as difficult to support) have engaged in safety plannning, been connected to the community, and their children are able to remain in the home.


October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
Discovering the Earliest Origins of Health and Disease: Intrauterine Inflammation as a Determinant of Future Disease
Alan Rosenberg, Department of Pediatrics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Almost all chronic diseases have their origins long before the disease first becomes apparent. The Saskatchewan-led, multidisciplinary research agenda aims to improve understanding of the earliest origins of disease by showing that inflammation during pregnancy can have adverse effects on the fetus that result in diseases developing in the child after birth. Prevention of chronic inflammation-mediated diseases is the ultimate goal of their team’s research, which proposes to thoroughly investigate intrauterine inflammation as a determinant of disease in the next generation.

In Saskatchewan, prevalence of prematurity; obesity and obesity-related diseases, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease; asthma; bone and joint diseases; and nervous system disorders represent major health burdens for affected individuals, their families, and society. There is evidence that these diseases have their origins before the disease becomes overtly manifest and that inflammation during pregnancy might promote the occurrence of these chronic diseases.

The research will identify factors in the pregnant mother, including blood test and genetic characteristics, which will show when inflammation is present. Knowing when inflammation is present will then allow for future research to study how inflammation during pregnancy is associated with premature birth, impaired development of the nervous system, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, reduced bone quality, and respiratory conditions such as asthma. The team will study associations between maternal lifestyle factors such as nutrition, physical activity, stress, social circumstances, and environmental exposures in conjunction with certain genetic vulnerabilities that promote inflammation during pregnancy.

This research consortium will be the first to study pregnancy inflammation and its effects on children after birth. More information about inflammation during pregnancy and its influences on future childhood diseases will help guide health promotion and disease prevention strategies to ensure healthy children now and into their long-term futures.


October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Stream: Resources & Skill Development
Introduction to Handle with Care: Promoting the Mental Health of Young Children with Four Key Building Blocks
Laurie McPherson, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Winnipeg, MB
Sherri Armstrong, Milestones Project, Mental Health & Wellness, Battle River, AB

Families form the primary resource of social and emotional development of young children and play a major role in laying the foundation for children’s positive mental health with lasting impacts throughout their lifetime. Parents may not always have the knowledge, experience, skills, or resources to provide this foundation for good mental health. A parent’s or caregiver’s attentive caring and responsive interaction with young children helps to develop a framework for healthy growth and development which is so critical to a child’s future success. Handle with Care is based on the premise that every parent or caregiver wants what is best for their child. The program helps them realize this goal through practical knowledge, skills, and simple strategies that adults can use in their everyday interactions with their children.

Handle with Care is a set of simple interactive strategies, activities, and discussions that help parents and caregivers to promote positive mental health of children from birth to age 6. The strategies are organized into building blocks representing four of the foundations of children’s mental health: secure attachment, building positive self-esteem, handling emotions, and building relationships.

The Handle with Care program began in 2009 and is led by the Hincks-Dellcrest Centre in Toronto. The project developed resources and training materials that support the mental health promotion of children from birth to 6 years in a variety of community settings, with an evaluation funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada’s Innovation Strategy for mental health promotion. The program has trained facilitators across Canada, and has been successfully delivered to diverse parents and caregivers.


October 6, 2017 | 9:40 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Stream: Child Maltreatment
Sexual Health Information for Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities: Collaborative Interprofessional Practice
B. Lee Murray, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Adolescents with developmental disabilities are often perceived as not having the ability to learn how to protect themselves against abuse. However, through education regarding sexual health and relationships, adolescents with developmental disabilities will be better equipped to protect themselves and more likely to have healthy peer relationships. Sexuality education has been shown to be effective in the prevention of sexual abuse, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted diseases among at-risk populations. In addition, models of school-based mental health service delivery have been found to be highly efficacious in other communities. Dr. Lee Murray from the College of Nursing, in partnership with Red Cross RespectED, Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools (GSCS), and Saskatoon Sexual Abuse and Information Center (SSAIC) for over 10 years, has developed and implemented a safe environments and healthy relationships program for adolescents with developmental disabilities. Using a community development approach, this project implements educational resources required to ensure safe communities for adolescents with developmental disabilities. The interprofessional team involves the collaboration of professionals and university students from the disciplines of Nursing, Medicine, Educational Psychology, Psychology, and Social Work. This community-engaged experiential learning environment provides the foundation for interprofessional practice and collaboration and reflects the competencies for effective praxis. The main goal of the project is to create safe environments for adolescents with developmental disabilities and to promote their awareness of healthy relationships. Educational sessions and resources are also provided to teachers and parents.


October 6, 2017 | 9:40 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
The Babies, Books, and Bonding Program in Northern Saskatchewan: A Health Promotion Strategy for Building Oral Language and Early Literacy Skills in Children 0-5 Years
Jacqueline Lim, Mamawetan Churchill River Health Region, La Ronge, SK
Amanda Frain, Northern Saskatchewan Population Health Unit, La Ronge, SK

Compared to the province as a whole, more than twice the percentage of northern Saskatchewan children enter school with low levels of language development. Low literacy is linked to lower levels of academic achievement, employment, and income, and higher levels of stress, smoking, and injury.

Research has shown that when healthcare professionals discuss literacy development with parents, and provide them with tools such as books, it can have a positive effect on family attitudes towards reading, reading frequency, and pre-school language scores.

The Babies, Books, and Bonding program was created to support northern Saskatchewan parents with children between the ages of 0 and 5 years to build language and literacy skills with their children.

This presentation outlines how this inter-sectoral program runs and reaches over 750 children each year, providing age-appropriate board books and literacy education to northern Saskatchewan children and their families. Ongoing evaluation data of the Babies, Books, and Bonding program will also be reviewed, sharing evidence of its positive impact on literacy building behaviour in the home.


October 6, 2017 | 10:10 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
Creating a Culturally Safe Place: Saskatoon Mothers’ Centre Breastfeeding Peer Support Program
Johanna Bergerman, Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon, SK

A peer-led breastfeeding program has been organized with the hosts that run the Saskatoon Mothers’ Centre. This peer-led program has created a culturally safe space for Indigenous women and others to discuss their birthing and breastfeeding experiences. This session will describe the developmental process, learnings, and outcomes through stories from some of the women who have been involved.

Hotels and Parking Information

Park Town Hotel
Parktown Hotel

Address: 924 Spadina Crescent East, Saskatoon, SK
Phone: 306-244-5564
Toll Free: 1-800-667-3999
Queen: $125.00 per night
2 Queens: $140.00 per night
King: $150.00 per night
Additional Adult: $10.00 per night

Group Code: #229677
Free Shuttle Service, Continental Breakfast, Free Parking

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Holiday Inn Downtown
Holiday Inn Downtown

Address: 101 Pacific Avenue, Saskatoon SK S7K 1N8
Phone: 1-877-654-0228
King: $144.00 per night
Standard 2 Queen: $144.00 per night
Deluxe 2 Queen with Sleeper Chair: $154.00 per night
Additional Adult: $10.00 per night

Group Code: #Prevention Matters
Parking: $7.50/Day (Discounted from $15.00/Day)

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Hilton Garden Inn
Hilton Garden Inn

Address: 90 – 22nd Street East Saskatoon, SK S7K 3X6
Phone: 306-244-2311
Room Rate: $144.00 per night

Group Code: #Sask Prevention Institute

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Holiday Inn Express and Suites
Holiday Inn Express

Address: 315 Idylwyld North Saskatoon, SK S7L 0Z1
Phone: 306-384-8844
Toll Free: 1-877-654-0228
Room Rate: $129.00 per night

Group Code: #Prevention Matters Conference
Continental Breakfast, Free Parking, Free Internet

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Parking
ParkMe
Visit www.parkme.com for lists parking lots and prices.
Midtown Plaza Parkade
Parking Rate: $12.00/Daily