Prevention Matters 2017

Purpose:

Prevention Matters 2017 will provide opportunities to explore prevention efforts to support the health of Saskatchewan children. The conference will focus on four streams: public health; child maltreatment; maternal and infant health; resources and skill development for individuals who work directly with families (mothers, fathers, and other caregivers) and children.

Objectives:
  • Apply prevention/primary care strategies to emerging public health issues related to children and families
  • Explore current issues and new evidence pertinent to the identification, investigation, management, and prevention of child maltreatment
  • Discuss application of best evidence regarding current and emerging issues that impact the outcome of pregnancy for both the woman and infant
  • Practice skills and strategies to enhance the interaction between care provider and families
  • Explore the impact of trauma on the health of children and families and recognize the importance of a trauma-informed approach in clinical and non-clinical provision of care
  • Develop inter-sectoral connections that will facilitate prevention efforts

Speaker Bios

Keynote SpeakersConcurrent Speakers
Charlene Bearhead
Charlene Bearhead
October 4, 2017 | 3:00 – 4:15 p.m.
Integrating the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action into Practice

Charlene Bearhead is a mother, grandmother, community member, experienced educator, and education innovator with 30 years of regional, national, and international experience in the field. Most recently, Charlene served as the first Education Lead for the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation at the University of Manitoba, and is currently the project coordinator for the Alberta Joint Commitment to Action: Education for Reconciliation. She currently serves as the co-chair of the Downie-Wenjack Fund Board of Directors and is a member of the Pathways to Education Canada Indigenous Education Advisory Circle.

Charlene previously served as the National Coordinator for Project of Heart, the primary focus of which is the education of Canadians on the history and legacy of Indian Residential Schools in Canada; and for the National Day of Healing and Reconciliation, the primary goal of which is to educate Canadians on the legacy of federal government policy on various ethnic groups throughout Canada’s history and to promote respect and reconciliation. Ms. Bearhead coordinated the Education Days within the TRC National Events for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, which focused on inspiring teachers and students to further educate themselves around the history and legacy of Indian Residential Schools, as well as to support and facilitate the building of positive and respectful relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Canada.

Bearhead also served as the National Coordinator for the National Addictions Awareness Week at Native Counselling Services of Alberta. She was the curriculum writer for the education program Sacred Relationship with Water (www.sacredrelationship.ca) with BearPaw Media Productions. Charlene was the founder of Mother Earth’s Children’s Charter School in Alberta and coordinated the youth track of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2002 and the children’s program of the same international gathering in Edmonton, Alberta in 2006.

Charlene has served as a teacher, principal, education director, and superintendent, both on and off reserve, over the years and holds permanent teaching certificates from both Alberta and Manitoba.


Corey O’Soup
Corey O’Soup
October 4, 2017 | 4:15 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saskatchewan’s Advocate for Children and Youth

Corey O’Soup currently serves as Saskatchewan’s Advocate for Children and Youth. He was appointed on August 3, 2016 and assumed the position on November 1, 2016. Born and raised in Saskatchewan, Corey is a member of the Key First Nation and became the province’s first First Nations Advocate. Corey and his wife Jacinda have five children. Corey has an extensive career working on behalf of children and youth in his roles as teacher, senior policy analyst for the FSIN, provincial superintendent for the Ministry of Education, senior manager for the Alberta Ministry of Education, Executive Director for Education/Post-Secondary Education and Training for the FSIN, and as the First Nations and Métis Advisor at the Ministry of Education. In that role, Corey was appointed by the Premier to take the lead on the government’s response to the fatal shooting at a school in La Loche in January 2016. As the Advocate for Children and Youth, Corey says his priorities will be finding ways to reduce the number of First Nations and Métis youth in care. He also has a passion for improving mental health services for children and youth in Saskatchewan, and especially in the north where he has promised a special report on the issues surrounding youth suicides.


Linda O’Neill
Linda O’Neill
October 5, 2017 | 8:30 – 10:00 a.m.
Supporting Children and Families in Communities of Compassionate Practice: Trauma-Informed Approach

Dr. Linda O’Neill is a practicing counsellor, a certified trauma specialist, and Associate Professor at the University of Northern BC, and is the Clinical Coordinator at the Community Care Centre in Prince George, BC. From years of trauma practice in the Prince George community and the far North and through research on all aspects of trauma effects and interventions, Dr. O’Neill has compiled and designed trauma informed training with former research assistants and colleagues. Dr. O’Neill customizes the training for each professional group to ensure the greatest relevancy to practice. The training is constantly being refined to reflect the most recent research in the rapidly changing world of trauma support. This training has been customized and delivered to early childhood educators, teachers and support staff, graduate counselling students, BEd students, counsellors, drug and alcohol programs, Corrections professionals, Parole and Probation, Crown Council, John Howard Society volunteers, Youth Justice, and practitioners in Mental Health and Addictions and Primary Care teams within the Northern Health Authority.


Alec Corous
Alec Couros
October 5, 2017 | 3:30 – 4:45 p.m.
Raising the Selfie Generation: Social Media, Mental Health, and Digital Citizenship

Dr. Alec Couros is a professor of educational technology and media at the Faculty of Education, University of Regina, Saskatchewan. An award-winning educator, Alec helps his undergraduate and graduate students take up the incredible affordances of our connected world through the integration of educational technology in teaching and learning. Alec is also a well-recognized scholar and researcher who has given hundreds of keynotes and workshops around the globe on diverse topics such as connected/networked learning, digital citizenship, social media in education, and critical media literacy, providing educators, students, and parents with the knowledge necessary to take advantage of and thrive in our new digital reality. Finally, Alec is a passionate advocate of openness in education and demonstrates this commitment through his open access publications, considerable digital presence and contributions, and highly successful MOOCs and open boundary courses.


Sheldon Kennedy
Sheldon Kennedy
October 6, 2017 | 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Why I Didn’t Say Anything

Sheldon Kennedy won a Memorial Cup, World Junior Gold Medal, and skated for three teams in his eight-year NHL career. He is best known for his courageous decision to charge his Major Junior Hockey League coach with sexual assault for the abuse he suffered over a five-year period while a teenager under his care. Through this disclosure, and the important work that Sheldon continues to do, he has become an inspiration to millions of abuse survivors around the world.

Sheldon has been instrumental in bringing governments, public and private sector partners together to work collaboratively to influence policy change and improve the way child abuse is handled. He has influenced changes in Canadian law and has taken his message to the International Olympic Committee and the US Senate.

Sheldon is the Lead Director at the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre, the first-of-its-kind in Canada, offering full wrap-around services for victims of child abuse. He is also the co-founder of Respect Group Inc., which provides empowering online abuse, bullying and harassment prevention education to sport organizations, schools, and the workplace.

Angela Bowen
Angela Bowen
October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Where Are We Now? Update on the Initiatives of the MotherFirst Maternal Mental Health Strategy in Saskatchewan

Angela Bowen, RN, PhD is a Registered Nurse and Professor within the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan. She has extensive clinical, educator, and administrator experience in Obstetrics and Mental Health. Angela received a Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation New Investigator Establishment Award to evaluate the Maternal Mental Health Program that she spearheaded in Saskatoon. She holds CIHR funding for a longitudinal study of mother-child dyads from early pregnancy to age five. Angela facilitates the MotherFirst Maternal Mental Health Strategy in Saskatchewan; a knowledge translation project to increase awareness of maternal mental health. This project is also funded by CIHR. Angela was co-chair of the Registered Nurses of Ontario Best Practice Guidelines for Perinatal Depression and a member of the Family-Centered Maternity Care Guidelines Committee of Health Canada.


Louise Choquette
Louise Choquette
October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m.– 2:30 p.m.
Children See – Children Learn

Louise Choquette has been with the Best Start Resource Centre since 2005, where she has led initiatives in reaching Francophones, reproductive and child health of newcomers, physical activity, prenatal education, tobacco control, and early brain development. Her previous employment was with public health in Ontario.


Danna Ormstrup
Danna Ormstrup
October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Working with Hidden Disabilities…The Challenges and the Rewards

Danna Ormstrup, B.A. is the Executive Director of the Foothills Fetal Alcohol Society, located in High River, Alberta. She has had the privilege of supporting a variety of people in a myriad of settings and loves to share her experiences and passion for people with complicated behaviours. From recreational programs to in-home visitation, and inclusive employment placements to residential support, Danna is confident that experiential opportunities for learning that build empathy and understanding will lead to compassionate response in all interactions with all kinds of people.


Alan Rosenberg
Alan Rosenberg
October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
Discovering the Earliest Origins of Health and Disease: Intrauterine Inflammation as a Determinant of Future Disease

Dr. Rosenberg is a professor of Pediatrics, former Head of the Department of Pediatrics, and current Head of the Divisions of Rheumatology and Research, Department of Pediatrics, University of Saskatchewan. Since 1981, he has directed the Pediatric Rheumatology program in Saskatchewan and has directed the University of Saskatchewan’s Pediatric Rheumatic Disease Research Laboratory.

Dr. Rosenberg’s research includes transdisciplinary studies showing how genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors interact to influence the occurrence and outcomes of diseases. He leads and participates in research initiatives that contribute to characterizing the utility of biomarker profiling in childhood arthritis and studying how inflammation occurring during pregnancy can influence the occurrence of future inflammatory-mediated diseases.

Dr. Rosenberg advocates for transdisciplinary collaborations, involving biomedical and non-biomedical disciplines, to achieve the highest standards of clinical care and research for children and families. Dr. Rosenberg’s research is aimed at discovering the earliest origins of disease to guide and inform the development of disease prevention strategies.


Lee Murray
Lee Murray
October 6, 2017 | 9:40 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Sexual Health Information for Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities: Collaborative Interprofessional Practice

Lee Murray is currently an Associate Professor at the College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan. She is also a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) in adolescent mental health. Lee holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, a Masters in Nursing, and a PhD Education Administration from the University of Saskatchewan. Lee teaches in the area of adolescent mental health, individual and group counselling, interprofessional practice and leadership, and school health in context of the role of a mental health nurse in schools. Lee’s clinical practice and research involves working in schools with adolescents with developmental disabilities regarding sexual health education. She has a great interest and curiosity regarding “Mothering.” To satisfy this curiosity, Lee uses auto-ethnography as methodology to explore the normative discourse of mothering in the context of her own experiences as a mom.

Session Descriptions / Abstracts

Keynote SessionsConcurrent Sessions
October 4, 2017 | 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Children’s Health: Standing Together
Dr. David Torr, Chair, Medical Health Officers Council of Saskatchewan
Dr. Juliet Soper, Pediatrician and Head Department of Pediatrics, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region
Dr. George Carson, Senior Medical Officer and Maternal Fetal Medicine, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region
Dr. James Irvine, Medical Health Officer, Northern Saskatchewan Health Regions (Athabasca Health Authority, Keewatin Yatthé, and Mamawetan Churchill River Health Regions)

Saskatchewan experts will address three streams of the conference – public health, child maltreatment, and maternal and infant health. The first three speakers will address the current issues and trends in their areas of expertise. The final speaker will address the importance of prevention, the interconnection of the streams, and the vital roles that conference delegates play in improving the health of children and families.

October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
Where Are We Now? Update on the Initiatives of the MotherFirst Maternal Mental Health Strategy in Saskatchewan
Angela Bowen, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Anxiety and depression are serious problems for up to 20% of pregnant and postpartum women, with potentially serious effects for the mother and her entire family.

The MotherFirst Strategy for Maternal Mental Health was developed by a provincial working group of healthcare professionals and public representatives to address gaps in education, screening, and services in Saskatchewan. The strategy was endorsed by the Minister of Health in 2010. Since that time, a number of initiatives have been implemented to improve maternal mental health.

This presentation will update participants on the latest MotherFirst initiatives and those in progress. This will include the Maternal Mental Health Toolkit resource, depression and anxiety screening in pregnancy and postpartum, and intervention options available in the province.


October 4, 2017 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Stream: Resources & Skill Development
Children See – Children Learn
Louise Choquette, Best Start Resource Centre, Toronto, ON

In the fall of 2015, the Best Start Resource Centre launched a province-wide campaign in Ontario on child discipline. The goal of the campaign was to reduce the prevalence of physical and emotional punishment of children from birth to age 6. In order to ensure that the messages and strategies for this campaign were evidence-based, the following research components were undertaken: key informant interviews; an environmental scan of other campaigns; identification of best practices for child discipline; a parent survey; and a service provider needs assessment. The session will provide highlights of this research, offer an overview of the campaign components available to service providers to assist parents in using developmentally appropriate strategies to guide their child’s behaviour from birth to age 6, and provide some evaluation data. Participants will be able to use the materials available for Children See – Children Learn in their communities. The main element of the campaign is a website available to all.


October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Stream: Resources & Skill Development
Working with Hidden Disabilities…The Challenges and the Rewards
Danna Ormstrup, Foothills Fetal Alcohol Society, High River, AB

Ever feel like you are giving good information, supporting with great strategies and interventions, but are not seeing the results you expected? It might be a hidden issue in brain function!

In this workshop, participants will be invited to have the opportunity to explore a variety of executive functioning issues through interactive “Brain Games” designed to promote empathy and understanding. This workshop not only looks at those complicated behaviours of the people with whom you work, but also encourages examination of learning styles and preferences and how they affect outcomes.

Join Danna on a journey around brains and learn about executive functioning and its effect on behaviour. You will be surprised, inspired, and committed to continued passion for the work they do!


October 5, 2017 | 12:50 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Stream: Child Maltreatment
Understanding and Working with Traumatized and Maltreated Children
Barb Afseth and Christina Tarko, Children’s Mental Health Services, Saskatoon, SK

Based on the work of Dr. Bruce Perry and the Child Trauma Academy, this workship will:

  • define and discuss the impact of early adverse experiences and poor relational health on brain development in children
  • share key principles of brain development
  • translate how early adverse experiences can impact the child’s behaviour including the ability to attach in relationships and the ability to self-regulate

Based on information discussed earlier in the workshop, Barb and Christina will discuss the strategies that adults in the children’s lives can use to support their healthy development (caregivers, daycare staff, and teachers).


October 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
Stream: Maternal & Infant Health
Discovering the Earliest Origins of Health and Disease: Intrauterine Inflammation as a Determinant of Future Disease
Alan Rosenberg, Department of Pediatrics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Almost all chronic diseases have their origins long before the disease first becomes apparent. The Saskatchewan-led, multidisciplinary research agenda aims to improve understanding of the earliest origins of disease by showing that inflammation during pregnancy can have adverse effects on the fetus that result in diseases developing in the child after birth. Prevention of chronic inflammation-mediated diseases is the ultimate goal of their team’s research, which proposes to thoroughly investigate intrauterine inflammation as a determinant of disease in the next generation.

In Saskatchewan, prevalence of prematurity; obesity and obesity-related diseases, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease; asthma; bone and joint diseases; and nervous system disorders represent major health burdens for affected individuals, their families, and society. There is evidence that these diseases have their origins before the disease becomes overtly manifest and that inflammation during pregnancy might promote the occurrence of these chronic diseases.

The research will identify factors in the pregnant mother, including blood test and genetic characteristics, which will show when inflammation is present. Knowing when inflammation is present will then allow for future research to study how inflammation during pregnancy is associated with premature birth, impaired development of the nervous system, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, reduced bone quality, and respiratory conditions such as asthma. The team will study associations between maternal lifestyle factors such as nutrition, physical activity, stress, social circumstances, and environmental exposures in conjunction with certain genetic vulnerabilities that promote inflammation during pregnancy.

This research consortium will be the first to study pregnancy inflammation and its effects on children after birth. More information about inflammation during pregnancy and its influences on future childhood diseases will help guide health promotion and disease prevention strategies to ensure healthy children now and into their long-term futures.


October 6, 2017 | 9:40 a.m. – 10:40 a.m.
Stream: Child Maltreatment
Sexual Health Information for Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities: Collaborative Interprofessional Practice
Lee Murray, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Adolescents with developmental disabilities are often perceived as not having the ability to learn how to protect themselves against abuse. However, through education regarding sexual health and relationships, adolescents with developmental disabilities will be better equipped to protect themselves and more likely to have healthy peer relationships. Sexuality education has been shown to be effective in the prevention of sexual abuse, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted diseases among at-risk populations. In addition, models of school-based mental health service delivery have been found to be highly efficacious in other communities. Dr. Lee Murray from the College of Nursing, in partnership with Red Cross RespectED, Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools (GSCS), and Saskatoon Sexual Abuse and Information Center (SSAIC) for over 10 years, has developed and implemented a safe environments and healthy relationships program for adolescents with developmental disabilities. Using a community development approach, this project implements educational resources required to ensure safe communities for adolescents with developmental disabilities. The interprofessional team involves the collaboration of professionals and university students from the disciplines of Nursing, Medicine, Educational Psychology, Psychology, and Social Work. This community-engaged experiential learning environment provides the foundation for interprofessional practice and collaboration and reflects the competencies for effective praxis. The main goal of the project is to create safe environments for adolescents with developmental disabilities and to promote their awareness of healthy relationships. Educational sessions and resources are also provided to teachers and parents.


Hotels and Parking Information

Park Town Hotel
Parktown Hotel

Address: 924 Spadina Crescent East, Saskatoon, SK
Phone: 306-244-5564
Toll Free: 1-800-667-3999
Queen: $125.00 per night
2 Queens: $140.00 per night
King: $150.00 per night
Additional Adult: $10.00 per night

Group Code: #229677
Free Shuttle Service, Continental Breakfast, Free Parking

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Holiday Inn Downtown
Holiday Inn Downtown

Address: 101 Pacific Avenue, Saskatoon SK S7K 1N8
Phone: 1-877-654-0228
King: $144.00 per night
Standard 2 Queen: $144.00 per night
Deluxe 2 Queen with Sleeper Chair: $154.00 per night
Additional Adult: $10.00 per night

Group Code: #Prevention Matters
Parking: $7.50/Day (Discounted from $15.00/Day)

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Hilton Garden Inn
Hilton Garden Inn

Address: 90 – 22nd Street East Saskatoon, SK S7K 3X6
Phone: 306-244-2311
Room Rate: $144.00 per night

Group Code: #Sask Prevention Institute

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Holiday Inn Express and Suites
Holiday Inn Express

Address: 315 Idylwyld North Saskatoon, SK S7L 0Z1
Phone: 306-384-8830
Toll Free: 1-877-654-0228
Room Rate: $129.00 per night

Group Code: #Prevention Matters Conference
Continental Breakfast, Free Parking, Free Internet

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Parking
ParkMe
Visit www.parkme.com for lists parking lots and prices.
Midtown Plaza Parkade
Parking Rate: $12.00/Daily