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Mapping Our Road To Success


October 7 & 8, 2014

The Saskatoon Inn & Conference Centre
2002 Airport Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7L 6M4

Final registration deadline is September 30, 2014

  • The Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA) has approved FASDlive 2014 for 11.5 Continuing Education Credit Hours (CEC).
  • The Law Society of Saskatchewan Continuing Professional Development has approved FASDlive 2014 for 12.0 CPD Hours.

Registration

Registration fee includes conference material, refreshment breaks, lunch, and a certificate of attendance.
Register Online

If you are unable to register online, please click the link below to download a copy of the Registration Form. Registration forms may be printed off and mailed or faxed to:
FASD Support Network of Saskatchewan Inc.
510 Cynthia Street
Saskatoon, SK  S7L 7K7
or Fax: 306-242-8007

FASDLive 2014 Registration Form

If you have any questions or concerns regarding registration, please contact:
Shana Mohr
FASD Support Network of Saskatchewan Inc.
Bus. 306-975-0868
Toll Free: 1-866-673-3276
Email: fasdcoordinator@sasktel.net

Program

To print off a complete copy of the Program shown below, click on the link below.

FASDLive 2014 Program

If you have any questions about the program, please contact:
Marlene Dray
Saskatchewan Prevention Institute
Bus. 306-651-4306
Email: mdray@skprevention.ca

DAY 1: Tuesday, October 7, 2014DAY 2: Wednesday, October 8, 2014
7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Registration and Breakfast
8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks
9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Facilitated PanelFASD: Highlighting Saskatchewan Programs and Services

Facilitator: Randy Robinson, Robinson Consulting
Justice: Judge Shannon Metivier, Provincial Court of Saskatchewan
Diagnosis and Assessment: Dr. Mansfield Mela, Associate Professor, University of Saskatchewan
Prevention: Noreen Agrey, Executive Director, Saskatchewan Prevention Institute
Support: Leslie Allen, Executive Director, FASD Support Network of Saskatchewan
Alcohol and Addictions: Dr. Peter Butt, Associate Professor, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan
Education: Michelle Mougeot, Consultant of Instruction, Ministry of Education
The Saskatchewan Advocate for Children and Youth: Cheryl Starr, Regional Advocate
10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Refreshments and Snacks
10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Concurrent Sessions 1A – 1D1A – Prevent FASD: Raise Awareness and Have the Conversation

Marlene Dray, FASD Prevention Program Coordinator
Bev Drew, FASD Prevention Team Lead
Saskatchewan Prevention Institute

When researchers discovered Fetal Alcohol Syndrome 40 years ago, they thought this disability could easily be prevented just by letting people know about it. Time has shown that is not true. Having a pregnancy without alcohol is more complex than just knowing about it. There are many reasons a woman may drink while pregnant.

In this session, Marlene Dray and Bev Drew will talk about why women drink, how alcohol can affect a developing baby, address some of the myths about drinking while pregnant, and discuss a variety of strategies to help prevent FASD in your community.


1B – FASD Program – Prevention, Education and Support

Charlotte Greenall, FASD Program Coordinator, Saskatoon Health Region
Holly Graham-Marrs, Assistant Professor, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan
Hashle Belanger, Parent

Some women (and men) find themselves caught up in a life of prostitution, homelessness, drug and alcohol addiction, gang involvement, and abusive relationships. They need a safe, non- judgemental place to receive support with addictions, life skills, parenting, grief, anxiety, nutrition, and personal development. In Saskatoon, the Saskatoon Health Region (Mental Health and Addiction Services) in partnership with the Westside Community Clinic provides this type of support. It is one of three intensive FASD prevention pilot projects in Saskatchewan.

Women have named one of the support groups “OASIS” which stands for Opportunity, Acceptance, Support, Invitation, Safe, with the motto “we exist”. This session will describe programs, services, success stories, and challenges.


1C – Behaviours: Understanding the Link and Applying Strategies

Shana Mohr, Community Education Coordinator, FASD Support Network of Saskatchewan

In order to find successful strategies that work, you first need to understand the disability and the root cause of the behaviours. When you develop knowledge of the disability first, you are then able to come up with new and innovative strategies that will help to set individuals up for success. Shana will work with you to brainstorm and share strategies that you can try with individuals you are supporting.


1D – The BC FASD Key Worker Program

Roxanne Hughes, FASD/Complex Needs Key Worker/Social Worker, Pacific Community Resources Society

The FASD Key Worker Program is a unique family support program, funded by the province of British Columbia. Key Workers provide support to families who are parenting children/youth (birth to 19) with an FASD diagnosis, suspected of having an FASD, or have the BC “Complex Developmental Behaviour Condition” designation.

While practice varies from region to region, all areas offer a broad spectrum of progressive individualized supports to families parenting individuals with/or suspected of having an FASD. The BC Key Worker program is founded in an accommodations model which strives to create an environment of success for those impacted.

Key Workers hail from a variety of backgrounds bringing rich resources and experiences into the families they serve. This presentation will provide an overview of the BC Key Worker Program, explore best practice, and offer strategies for participants to inform their work.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions 2A – 2D2A – Honouring our Strengths: Indigenous Culture as Intervention in Addictions Treatment

Colleen Dell, Research Chair in Substance Abuse, Department of Sociology and School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan
Barbara Fornssler, Research Manager for the Culture as Interventions Project, Department of Sociology, University of Saskatchewan

Drug addiction among Indigenous peoples is a serious health concern in Canada. The aim of this community-based research team’s work is to evaluate the effectiveness of First Nations culture as a health intervention in alcohol and drug treatment. Health for First Nations is broadly envisioned as wellness and is understood to exist where there is physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual harmony. Indigenous knowledge shares that traditional culture is vital for client healing. However, there is a serious absence of empirical documentation of its impact on client wellness.

This project is the first of its kind in Canada and is suitably timed with renewal processes underway in Canada’s First Nations addictions treatment system. A key recommendation of the renewal has been the establishment of a culturally competent evidence base to document the nature and demonstrate the effectiveness of cultural interventions within treatment programs. The project team gathered understanding of how Indigenous traditional culture is understood and practiced at a sample of 12 First Nations residential treatment programs. They undertook a three-day environmental scan led by an Indigenous Elder at each; this constituted Phase I of the study. Phase I also involved developing a wellness framework and the identification of cultural interventions based on research findings. From this, a valid instrument to measure the impact of cultural interventions on client wellness is being developed and tested.


2B – FASD Prevention: The Role of a Woman’s Health Care Provider

Dr. Jennifer Blake, Chief Executive Officer, Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

This presentation will highlight the SOGC Alcohol Use and Pregnancy Consensus Clinical Guidelines. These national standards of care are based on the most up-to-date evidence. The standards suggest screening and counseling women and girls about their alcohol use in order to prevent FASD. These guidelines will be considered in the broader context of identifying women at risk, understanding what is behind high risk behaviour, and effectively intervening to reduce harm.


2C – Strategies and Stories about Teaching and Mentoring Individuals with FASD

Carrie Ann Schemenauer, Teacher, Saskatchewan Rivers School Division; and FASD Speaker, Saskatchewan FASD Speakers’ Bureau

This presentation will provide information on how FASD affects the brain and behaviour. The speaker will give many concrete examples of the problems that individuals with FASD face, from her time in the classroom as well as from her knowledge gained as a mentor and researcher. She will share best practices on strategies from her studies and her own experiences with this population. Carrie Ann is passionate about the importance of understanding how FASD affects individuals, the necessity of altering our expectations, and the need to provide appropriate supports to improve the individual’s self-concept and future.


2D – “My Curious Brain” Book, Curriculum and Song: Emotional Regulation Strategies for Parents, Day Cares, Schools and Therapists

Brent McKee, Senior Social Worker, KidsFirst Yorkton
Britton Houdek, Social Worker, Sunrise Health Region
Jackie Washenfelder, Music Therapist, Positively Music Therapy

Have you ever wondered how to teach children and caregivers about brain development? KidsFirst (Yorkton) and Community partners have created a 3 part resource for caregivers, daycares, and other helping professionals that introduces a thoughtful way of talking about neurobiology and how the brain functions. This workshop provides an introduction to how the brain is built and explains how it can affect behaviour. The three parts include a story, curriculum, and song. Recently, there has been a great deal of research on neurobiology; however, this wonderful information is often inaccessible to parents and caregivers. This resource is one way to put the research into the hands of caregivers and children, putting theory into practice. This can be a starting point for children and caregivers, providing a meaningful way to understand what’s going on inside their brains. When children and parents have a greater understanding of how their brain works, they will then know how to support their child and help create a healthy brain…even an FASD brain.

The curriculum was developed by the Yorkton KidsFirst team to take inside the home and deliver the emotional regulation concepts in an engaging way. The workshop offers a variety of exercises for both parents and children that will calm the monkey, and allow the wise owl to work in harmony with the rest of the brain.

2:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Refreshments and Snacks
3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Keynote: Ann Dowsett Johnston, Author, Speaker, JournalistThe Drinking Diaries: Why Women Drink Too Much and What We Can Do About It

Alcohol consumption is on the rise, and women are leading the growth, both here and in most of the developing world. Parity in postsecondary achievement, parity in the workforce, and now this? Clearly, this is not what Gloria Steinem had in mind. The marketers think differently. Ann Dowsett Johnston explores this phenomenon: what’s driving the trend in risky drinking for all age groups, the health risks, and what can be done.

Ann Dowsett Johnston, an award-winning journalist, is well respected for her expertise in higher education, alcohol addiction, and public policy relating to both. For 14 years, she oversaw two bestselling projects: the Maclean’s university rankings and the Maclean’s Guide to Canadian Universities. Dowsett Johnston spent time researching the issue of Women and Alcohol as part of the Atkinson Fellowship in Public Policy. Provocative and dynamic, she engages audiences at a deeply personal level, exploring subjects that challenge many Canadian families. Her recent focus is a brave and informed look at women and alcohol. Her book, Drink: The Intimate Relationship Between Women and Alcohol, quickly became a Kindle bestseller in North America.

4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Networking Social – $10.00 (Optional)

Please join us following the conference on Tuesday, October 7 for a Networking Social. Appetizers will be provided along with cash beverage options. This evening is an opportunity for conference delegates to network with each other in a relaxed environment. Tickets can be purchased for only $10.00 with your registration.

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Breakfast
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Keynote: Jeff Noble, Founder and CEO, Noble Initiatives“FASD is forever, frustration is not”

These are the words Jeff Noble lives by. Jeff’s energy and passion about FASD are contagious. He is excited to share his journey with you and how he became involved in the world of FASD. Jeff not only understands the difficulties an individual living with FASD faces, he also understands what caregivers experience as he has also played that role. Jeff will explore the three secret weapons of being a caregiver: education, humour, and community. He will help normalize the disability and share stories of success. Jeff will rejuvenate you and encourage feelings of hope!

Jeff Noble is the Founder and CEO of Noble Initiatives, an organization that provides hope and education to people caring for someone living with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) through online applications and in-person training sessions, demonstrations, and consultations. Jeff is a helper, a leader, and an innovator. His focus is FASD, but his expertise is building community through social media. Using an interactive, yet personal approach, Jeff delivers relevant, useful, and need-to-know information to help and support front line workers, educators, and caregivers of those living with FASD.

10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Refreshments and Snacks
10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Concurrent Sessions 3A – 3D3A – Project Choices: Drinking and Doing it Deserves a Discussion (Part 1 of 2)

Kathryn Fix, Project Choices Counselor
Michelle Juarez, Project Choices Counselor
NorWest Co-op Community Health

Project CHOICES is a short-term, secondary prevention counseling program, targeted at women of childbearing age who are drinking above Canada’s low-risk drinking guidelines and/or are using ineffective or inconsistent birth control. Project CHOICES is based on an American research study of the same name, and is offered in the same format; 4 one-on-one, in-person counseling sessions, and one consultation session with a reproductive healthcare provider. The counseling sessions are conducted using motivational interviewing to express empathy, enhance intrinsic motivation, and resolve ambivalence around drinking and/or contraceptive use. Project CHOICES has been offered in Winnipeg, Manitoba, via two separate community healthcare agencies, and is the first program of its kind to be offered in Canada.

The presentation will focus on exploring the evolution of the program since its inception in 2010. This includes a widespread social marketing campaign that targets a younger female demographic than the original study, changes in eligibility criteria from the original study, and both the positive outcomes and challenges that have come with implementing Project CHOICES.


3B – Is What You are Thinking True?

Rand Teed, Owner/Creator, Drug Class

Helping people understand the effects of alcohol and other drug use on their brain can be an excellent lever to help them understand that they can change their thoughts and their lives. Many people use substances to deal with their problems. This presentation is designed to help them understand that substance use may, in fact, be the cause of the problem. It also helps remove the guilt and shame that resides in most people in relation to their substance use. The presentation is designed to help participants understand how to use information to help people change outcomes. It works equally as a prevention and an intervention model.


3C – Exploring Occupational Therapy (Part 1 of 2)

Amery Deren, Occupational Therapist

Sensory processing irregularities can be the direct result of prenatal exposure to alcohol. The exposure to alcohol results in changes to how the brain processes inputs from the environment. As a result, sensitivities or lack of sensations often contribute to confusing behaviours. Regular occupational therapy is highly recommended for individuals living with an FASD as it can help individuals learn to regulate in their responses to stimuli. This session will explore self-regulation and discuss some specific programs related to self-regulation. Amery will have a variety of different tools that can be used in the classroom and home environment. Attendees will have an opportunity to try these tools themselves. Amery will also be sharing specific strategies that calm the body and different strategies to alert the body. In addition, Amery will be joined by a colleague and together will help you explore other therapeutic options.


3D – Social Media and the Caregiver Connection

Jeff Noble, Founder and CEO, Noble Initiatives
Caregivers of those living with FASD are often isolated and unable to access appropriate and applicable support services. Many FASD caregivers and families report that no one around them really ‘gets’ FASD and they are left to deal and manage on their own. Accessing training, education, and support for caregivers of individuals with FASD is difficult.

Social media can help to decrease the isolation experienced by FASD caregivers. It also creates networking opportunities for caregivers to share strategies and suggestions. Social media also builds connections and bridges the gap between caregivers and frontline staff.

This workshop will teach caregivers and front line staff how to use social media for the purposes of training, learning, educating, and as a support network. Social media is a cost effective approach to increasing engagement and support for caregivers of people with an FASD.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Concurrent Sessions 4A – 4D4A – Project Choices: Drinking and Doing it Deserves a Discussion (Part 2 of 2)

Kathryn Fix, Project Choices Counselor
Michelle Juarez, Project Choices Counselor
NorWest Co-op Community Health

Please see description for 3A.


4B – Mapping and Evaluating Alberta’s FASD Service Networks and Community Based Initiatives

Hélène Wirzba, Director, Lead Consultant, Wirzba Consulting Inc.
Christopher Cameron, Director, Lead Consultant, Objective Research and Evaluation Inc.

Through the FASD Cross-Ministry-Committee (CMC), the Alberta Government provides funding to 12 regional FASD Service Networks. The community-based and community-led networks are the main vehicles through which primary, secondary, and tertiary FASD prevention programs are delivered. Services fall under four pillars: universal awareness, assessment and diagnosis, targeted and indicated prevention, and supports for individuals with FASD and caregivers. The service-delivery approach is captured in the Alberta FASD 10-Year Strategy, as well as in yearly Strategic and Operational Plans. Validating program outcomes through strong and reliable evaluation data was identified as one of the recommendations in the mid-term evaluation of the Alberta FASD strategy.

The presenters will share lessons learned from the development and implementation of FASD Service Network Evaluation Frameworks, how it has helped Alberta validate FASD program outcomes, and how it has increased awareness, acceptance, and adoption of evaluation practices among all stakeholder groups. They will then examine how the evaluation process and tools developed in Alberta are available and transferable to other jurisdictions.


4C – Exploring Occupational Therapy (Part 2 of 2)

Amery Deren, Occupational Therapist

Please see description for 3C.


4D – HUMOUR: The Impact on Relationship, Brain Activity and Emotional Wellbeing

Paul Pringle, Manager, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum of Services, Bissell Centre

Strength-based relationships are an essential component of change and healing, and are often a key factor to transformation. This presentation is about the dynamics of humour and the value to the therapeutic relationship. Laughter binds people together, triggering positive feelings and fostering emotional connections. Humour and laughter have an impact in positive ways; on brain activity, the physical body, emotional and social well-being, while also providing strength to overcome challenges and stress.

This experiential presentation will bring perspective and insight into the power of laughter and humour in frontline work, whether as a paid staff, parent/caregiver, or support person. The therapeutic benefits of laughter will leave positive impressions on care providers, and also on the individuals they serve. As a presenter, Paul Pringle incorporates his professional experience and demonstrates how humour can put a different perspective on events. “The intellectual benefits of a good laugh are most striking when it comes to solving a problem that demands a creative solution” (Goldberg, 2006). His own and other research have proven the effectiveness of humour in reducing stress. He will present an activity (Laughing Yoga) that is replicable and effective.

2:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Refreshments and Snacks
3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Facilitated Discussion: Randy Robinson, Robinson ConsultingMapping Our Road to Success: Future Possibilities for Saskatchewan

Hotels and Accommodations

Saskatoon Inn

The Saskatoon Inn & Conference Centre has set aside a block of rooms for the FASDlive Conference. They are offering a special rate for conference delegates of $169.00 – $179.00 CAD (per night, plus taxes). The rate code for these rooms is “FASD.” Call 306-242-1440 or toll free: 1-800-667-8789 to reserve your room. Guests attending FASDlive have until September 5, 2014 to reserve their rooms at the group rate.

Hotel Address
Saskatoon Inn & Conference Centre
2002 Airport Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7L 6M4

Keynote Speakers

Ann Dowsett Johnston

Ann Dowsett Johnston

Award-winning journalist

Ann Dowsett Johnston is well respected for her expertise in higher education, alcohol addiction, and public policy relating to both. For 14 years, she oversaw two bestselling projects: the Maclean’s university rankings and the Maclean’s Guide to Canadian Universities. Dowsett Johnston spent time researching the issue of Women and Alcohol as part of the Atkinson Fellowship in Public Policy. Provocative and dynamic, she engages audiences at a deeply personal level, exploring subjects that challenge many Canadian families. Her recent focus is a brave and informed look at women and alcohol. Her book, Drink: The Intimate Relationship Between Women and Alcohol, quickly became a Kindle bestseller in North America.

Jeff Noble

Jeff Noble

Founder of FASDForever
FASD Coach & Consultant

Jeff Noble is the Founder and CEO of Noble Initiatives, an organization that provides hope and education to people caring for someone living with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) through online applications and in-person training sessions, demonstrations, and consultations. Jeff is a helper, a leader, and an innovator. His focus is FASD, but his expertise is building community through social media. Using an interactive, yet personal approach, Jeff delivers relevant, useful, and need-to-know information to help and support front line workers, educators, and caregivers of those living with FASD.